Histamine-induced gastric acid secretion in horses

Diane L. Kitchen From the Island Whirl Equine Colic Research Laboratory, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

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A. M. Merritt From the Island Whirl Equine Colic Research Laboratory, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

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J. A. Burrow From the Island Whirl Equine Colic Research Laboratory, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

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Abstract

Objective

To determine gastric secretory responses in horses treated with histamine and to determine the dose of histamine needed to elicit maximal gastric secretion.

Animals

6 adult horses with an indwelling gastric cannula.

Procedure

Gastric contents were collected in 15-minute periods, and volume, pH, hydrogen ion concentration, hydrogen ion output, sodium concentration, and sodium output were determined. Values were determined without any treatment (baseline), after administration of pyrilamine maleate (1 mg/kg of body weight, IV, given during a 15-minute period), and during 1-hour infusions of histamine at 3 rates (7.5, 15, and 30 μg/kg/h, IV).

Results

Volume and hydrogen ion concentration of gastric contents and hydrogen ion output were significantly increased, compared with baseline values, during histamine infusion. Mean hydrogen ion concentration and hydrogen ion output were significantly greater during infusion of histamine at a rate of 15 or 30 μg/kg/h than at a rate of 7.5 μg/kg/h. Sodium concentration was significantly decreased, compared with baseline value, during histamine infusion, but sodium output was unchanged.

Conclusions

Histamine at doses of 15 and 30 μg/kg/h, IV stimulated maximal gastric secretion in horses. Histamine appeared to induce only parietal secretion.

Clinical Relevance

This study provides additional information related to equine gastric physiology, which may benefit further understanding of the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1303–1306)

Abstract

Objective

To determine gastric secretory responses in horses treated with histamine and to determine the dose of histamine needed to elicit maximal gastric secretion.

Animals

6 adult horses with an indwelling gastric cannula.

Procedure

Gastric contents were collected in 15-minute periods, and volume, pH, hydrogen ion concentration, hydrogen ion output, sodium concentration, and sodium output were determined. Values were determined without any treatment (baseline), after administration of pyrilamine maleate (1 mg/kg of body weight, IV, given during a 15-minute period), and during 1-hour infusions of histamine at 3 rates (7.5, 15, and 30 μg/kg/h, IV).

Results

Volume and hydrogen ion concentration of gastric contents and hydrogen ion output were significantly increased, compared with baseline values, during histamine infusion. Mean hydrogen ion concentration and hydrogen ion output were significantly greater during infusion of histamine at a rate of 15 or 30 μg/kg/h than at a rate of 7.5 μg/kg/h. Sodium concentration was significantly decreased, compared with baseline value, during histamine infusion, but sodium output was unchanged.

Conclusions

Histamine at doses of 15 and 30 μg/kg/h, IV stimulated maximal gastric secretion in horses. Histamine appeared to induce only parietal secretion.

Clinical Relevance

This study provides additional information related to equine gastric physiology, which may benefit further understanding of the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1303–1306)

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