Cytogenetic alterations in eight mammary tumors and tumor-suppressor gene p53 mutation in one mammary tumor from dogs

Burkhard Mayr From the Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics and the Institute for Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Veterinary University, Vienna A-1210, Austria.

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Andrea Dressier From the Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics and the Institute for Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Veterinary University, Vienna A-1210, Austria.

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Martin Reifinger From the Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics and the Institute for Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Veterinary University, Vienna A-1210, Austria.

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Christian Feil From the Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics and the Institute for Pathology and Forensic Medicine, Veterinary University, Vienna A-1210, Austria.

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SUMMARY

Objective

To identify mutations in canine mammary tumors.

Animals

10 tumor-bearing dogs.

Procedure

Culture of neoplastic cells originating from mammary tumors was performed, and trypsin-G banding was used for cytogenetic investigations. The same tumors were subjected to molecular genetic screening by use of DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, DNA elution, and DNA sequencing for ras oncogenes and the p53 tumor suppressor gene.

Results

A broad spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed, including trisomies, reciprocal translocations, and structural and numerical X-chromosome alterations and deletions. Molecular genetic analysis revealed a tumor suppressor p53 gene mutation in codon 249 of exon 7 in one instance. Interestingly, analyzed mammary tumors were free of mutations in N-ras, K-ras and H-ras, exons 1 and 2.

Conclusions

Chromosome alterations are wide-spread in canine mammary tumors, but no ras family mutations were detected in tumors from these 10 dogs.

Clinical Relevance

Knowledge about chromosome, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene damage could be helpful for diagnosis and prognosis of neoplastic diseases in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:69–78)

SUMMARY

Objective

To identify mutations in canine mammary tumors.

Animals

10 tumor-bearing dogs.

Procedure

Culture of neoplastic cells originating from mammary tumors was performed, and trypsin-G banding was used for cytogenetic investigations. The same tumors were subjected to molecular genetic screening by use of DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, DNA elution, and DNA sequencing for ras oncogenes and the p53 tumor suppressor gene.

Results

A broad spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed, including trisomies, reciprocal translocations, and structural and numerical X-chromosome alterations and deletions. Molecular genetic analysis revealed a tumor suppressor p53 gene mutation in codon 249 of exon 7 in one instance. Interestingly, analyzed mammary tumors were free of mutations in N-ras, K-ras and H-ras, exons 1 and 2.

Conclusions

Chromosome alterations are wide-spread in canine mammary tumors, but no ras family mutations were detected in tumors from these 10 dogs.

Clinical Relevance

Knowledge about chromosome, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene damage could be helpful for diagnosis and prognosis of neoplastic diseases in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:69–78)

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