Use of transabdominal ultrasound-guided amniocentesis for detection of equid herpesvirus 1-induced fetal infection in utero

Kenneth C. Smith From the Animal Health Trust Centre for Preventive Medicine, PO Box 5, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7DW (Smith, Binns, Mumford); and Beaufort Cottage Stables, High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 8JS (McGladdery), England.

Search for other papers by Kenneth C. Smith in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVM&S, PhD
,
Andrew J. McGladdery From the Animal Health Trust Centre for Preventive Medicine, PO Box 5, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7DW (Smith, Binns, Mumford); and Beaufort Cottage Stables, High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 8JS (McGladdery), England.

Search for other papers by Andrew J. McGladdery in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVMS
,
Matthew M. Binns From the Animal Health Trust Centre for Preventive Medicine, PO Box 5, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7DW (Smith, Binns, Mumford); and Beaufort Cottage Stables, High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 8JS (McGladdery), England.

Search for other papers by Matthew M. Binns in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BSc, PhD
, and
Jennifer A. Mumford From the Animal Health Trust Centre for Preventive Medicine, PO Box 5, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7DW (Smith, Binns, Mumford); and Beaufort Cottage Stables, High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 8JS (McGladdery), England.

Search for other papers by Jennifer A. Mumford in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BSc, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate transabdominal ultrasound-guided amniocentesis for detection of equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)-induced fetal infection in utero.

Animals

4 Welsh Mountain mares.

Procedure

Pregnant mares were inoculated intranasally with EHV-1 during the ninth month of gestation. Amniocentesis was initiated on postinoculation day (PID) 12, and was performed at 2- to 3-day intervals in standing mares under deep sedation. Amniotic fluid samples were tested by virus isolation (VI), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunoperoxidase cytologic examination (IC) for detection of EHV-1.

Results

Exposure to EHV-1 in the ninth month of gestation resulted in nasal shedding of infective virus, establishment of cell-associated viremia, and seroconversion. Equid herpesvirus 1 was detected by VI, PCR, and IC in amniotic fluid collected on PID 14 from 1 mare and on PID 16 and 17 from a second mare. Specimens of amniotic fluid from a third mare were VI negative until PID 18, when collections ceased, although this mare subsequently aborted an EHV-1-infected fetus on PID 28. The fourth mare aborted an EHV-1 infected fetus on PID 14. The 2 mares with VI-positive amniotic fluid were each carrying an EHV-1 infected fetus in utero, confirmed by examination of the uterus, placenta, and fetus, using specific immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Endothelial cells in the endometrium and allantochorion were often virus-infected, with accompanying vascular lesions. The fetus had been infected via the chorionic vasculature in the first and fourth mares, and by inhalation of infected amniotic fluid in the second mare.

Conclusion

Amniocentesis permits specific detection of EHV-1-induced fetal infection in utero.

Clinical Relevance

Amniocentesis may have a clinical role in the specific identification and isolation of mares carrying virus-infected fetuses during EHV-1- induced abortion epizootics. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:997–1002)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate transabdominal ultrasound-guided amniocentesis for detection of equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)-induced fetal infection in utero.

Animals

4 Welsh Mountain mares.

Procedure

Pregnant mares were inoculated intranasally with EHV-1 during the ninth month of gestation. Amniocentesis was initiated on postinoculation day (PID) 12, and was performed at 2- to 3-day intervals in standing mares under deep sedation. Amniotic fluid samples were tested by virus isolation (VI), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunoperoxidase cytologic examination (IC) for detection of EHV-1.

Results

Exposure to EHV-1 in the ninth month of gestation resulted in nasal shedding of infective virus, establishment of cell-associated viremia, and seroconversion. Equid herpesvirus 1 was detected by VI, PCR, and IC in amniotic fluid collected on PID 14 from 1 mare and on PID 16 and 17 from a second mare. Specimens of amniotic fluid from a third mare were VI negative until PID 18, when collections ceased, although this mare subsequently aborted an EHV-1-infected fetus on PID 28. The fourth mare aborted an EHV-1 infected fetus on PID 14. The 2 mares with VI-positive amniotic fluid were each carrying an EHV-1 infected fetus in utero, confirmed by examination of the uterus, placenta, and fetus, using specific immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Endothelial cells in the endometrium and allantochorion were often virus-infected, with accompanying vascular lesions. The fetus had been infected via the chorionic vasculature in the first and fourth mares, and by inhalation of infected amniotic fluid in the second mare.

Conclusion

Amniocentesis permits specific detection of EHV-1-induced fetal infection in utero.

Clinical Relevance

Amniocentesis may have a clinical role in the specific identification and isolation of mares carrying virus-infected fetuses during EHV-1- induced abortion epizootics. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:997–1002)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 57 57 5
PDF Downloads 26 26 1
Advertisement