Myoelectric activity of the cecum and proximal loop of the ascending colon in cows after spontaneous cecal dilatation/dislocation

Susi Stocker From the Clinic for Food Animals and Horses, University of Bern, Bremgartenstr 109 A, 3012 Bern, Switzerland (Stocker, Steiner, Geiser); and the Department of Theriogenology, University of Zürich, Switzerland (Kündig).

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Dr Adrian Steiner From the Clinic for Food Animals and Horses, University of Bern, Bremgartenstr 109 A, 3012 Bern, Switzerland (Stocker, Steiner, Geiser); and the Department of Theriogenology, University of Zürich, Switzerland (Kündig).

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Dr Susi Geiser From the Clinic for Food Animals and Horses, University of Bern, Bremgartenstr 109 A, 3012 Bern, Switzerland (Stocker, Steiner, Geiser); and the Department of Theriogenology, University of Zürich, Switzerland (Kündig).

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Dr Hans Kündig From the Clinic for Food Animals and Horses, University of Bern, Bremgartenstr 109 A, 3012 Bern, Switzerland (Stocker, Steiner, Geiser); and the Department of Theriogenology, University of Zürich, Switzerland (Kündig).

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Abstract

Objective

To analyze myoelectric activity of the cecum and proximal loop of the ascending colon (PLAC) in cows after spontaneous cecal dilatation/dislocation (CDD) and compare it with that in healthy cows after surgical evacuation of the cecum.

Animals

12 cows with spontaneous CDD and 6 healthy cows (group C). Cows with spontaneous CDD were retrospectively assigned to 2 groups: delayed recovery from surgery or recurrence (group A; n = 3), and normal recovery (group B; n = 9).

Procedure

After surgical evacuation of the cecum, 8 pairs of bipolar, retrievable electrodes were implanted in the ileum, cecum, and PLAC. Cows were evaluated daily from postoperative day 1 to 7, using routine clinical methods and computer-based analysis of myoelectric activity of the cecum and PLAC. Parameters of myoelectric activity included rate of spike bursts, duration of individual spike bursts, duration of overall spike burst activity per electrode, rate of propagated spike burst sequences, and ratio of orally propagated spike burst sequences.

Results

Rate of spike bursts, duration of cecocolic spike burst activity, and ratio of orally to aborally propagated spike burst sequences did not vary among groups during the 7-day recording period. However, cows with delayed recovery had a typical, uniform pattern of myoelectric activity of the cecum and PLAC at days 1 and 2 after surgery that consisted of repeated, propagated spike burst sequences, made up of spike bursts of significantly (P < 0.05) increased duration at postsurgical day 1 and substantially prolonged duration at postsurgical day 2, interrupted by periods of little or no activity.

Conclusion

Delayed recovery and recurrence of CDD in cows after spontaneous CDD is not caused by hypomotility of the cecum and PLAC.

Clinical Relevance

Postoperative treatment, intended to reduce recurrence of CDD or delayed recovery after surgical evacuation of the cecum, should address propagation of digesta in the spiral colon. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:961–968)

Abstract

Objective

To analyze myoelectric activity of the cecum and proximal loop of the ascending colon (PLAC) in cows after spontaneous cecal dilatation/dislocation (CDD) and compare it with that in healthy cows after surgical evacuation of the cecum.

Animals

12 cows with spontaneous CDD and 6 healthy cows (group C). Cows with spontaneous CDD were retrospectively assigned to 2 groups: delayed recovery from surgery or recurrence (group A; n = 3), and normal recovery (group B; n = 9).

Procedure

After surgical evacuation of the cecum, 8 pairs of bipolar, retrievable electrodes were implanted in the ileum, cecum, and PLAC. Cows were evaluated daily from postoperative day 1 to 7, using routine clinical methods and computer-based analysis of myoelectric activity of the cecum and PLAC. Parameters of myoelectric activity included rate of spike bursts, duration of individual spike bursts, duration of overall spike burst activity per electrode, rate of propagated spike burst sequences, and ratio of orally propagated spike burst sequences.

Results

Rate of spike bursts, duration of cecocolic spike burst activity, and ratio of orally to aborally propagated spike burst sequences did not vary among groups during the 7-day recording period. However, cows with delayed recovery had a typical, uniform pattern of myoelectric activity of the cecum and PLAC at days 1 and 2 after surgery that consisted of repeated, propagated spike burst sequences, made up of spike bursts of significantly (P < 0.05) increased duration at postsurgical day 1 and substantially prolonged duration at postsurgical day 2, interrupted by periods of little or no activity.

Conclusion

Delayed recovery and recurrence of CDD in cows after spontaneous CDD is not caused by hypomotility of the cecum and PLAC.

Clinical Relevance

Postoperative treatment, intended to reduce recurrence of CDD or delayed recovery after surgical evacuation of the cecum, should address propagation of digesta in the spiral colon. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:961–968)

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