Cardiopulmonary and anesthetic effects of propofol in wild turkeys

Juergen Schumacher From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Schumacher); and the White Oak Conservation Center, 726 Owens Rd, Yulee, FL 32097 (Citino, Hernandez, Hutt, Dixon).

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Scott B. Citino From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Schumacher); and the White Oak Conservation Center, 726 Owens Rd, Yulee, FL 32097 (Citino, Hernandez, Hutt, Dixon).

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Kelly Hernandez From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Schumacher); and the White Oak Conservation Center, 726 Owens Rd, Yulee, FL 32097 (Citino, Hernandez, Hutt, Dixon).

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Julie Hutt From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Schumacher); and the White Oak Conservation Center, 726 Owens Rd, Yulee, FL 32097 (Citino, Hernandez, Hutt, Dixon).

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Brandon Dixon From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (Schumacher); and the White Oak Conservation Center, 726 Owens Rd, Yulee, FL 32097 (Citino, Hernandez, Hutt, Dixon).

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Abstract

Objective

To determine safety, anesthetic variables, and cardiopulmonary effects of IV infusion of propofol for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in wild turkeys.

Animals

10 healthy, adult wild turkeys.

Procedure

Anesthesia was induced by IV administration of propofol (5 mg/kg of body weight) over 20 seconds and was maintained for 30 minutes by constant IV infusion of propofol at a rate of 0.5 mg/kg/min. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial blood pressures, and arterial blood gas tensions were obtained prior to propofol administration (baseline values) and again at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after induction of anesthesia. All birds were intubated immediately after induction of anesthesia, and end-tidal CO2 concentration was determined at the same time intervals. Supplemental oxygen was not provided.

Results

Apnea was observed for 10 to 30 seconds after propofol administration, which induced a decrease in heart rate; however, the changes were not significant. Compared with baseline values, respiratory rate was significantly decreased at 4 minutes after administration of propofol and thereafter. Systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures decreased over the infusion period, but the changes were not significant. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased by 30% after 15 minutes of anesthesia; end-tidal CO2 concentration increased from baseline values after 30 minutes; PO2 was significantly decreased at 5 minutes after induction and thereafter; PCO2 was significantly (P< 0.05) increased after 15 minutes of anesthesia; and arterial oxygen saturation was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased at the end of anesthesia. Two male turkeys developed severe transient hypoxemia, 1 at 5 and the other at 15 minutes after induction. Time to standing after discontinuation of propofol infusion was 11 ± 6 minutes. Recovery was smooth and unremarkable.

Conclusion

Propofol is an effective agent for IV induction and maintenance of anesthesia in wild turkeys, and is useful for short procedures or where the use of inhalational agents is contraindicated. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1014–1017)

Abstract

Objective

To determine safety, anesthetic variables, and cardiopulmonary effects of IV infusion of propofol for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in wild turkeys.

Animals

10 healthy, adult wild turkeys.

Procedure

Anesthesia was induced by IV administration of propofol (5 mg/kg of body weight) over 20 seconds and was maintained for 30 minutes by constant IV infusion of propofol at a rate of 0.5 mg/kg/min. Heart and respiratory rates, arterial blood pressures, and arterial blood gas tensions were obtained prior to propofol administration (baseline values) and again at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after induction of anesthesia. All birds were intubated immediately after induction of anesthesia, and end-tidal CO2 concentration was determined at the same time intervals. Supplemental oxygen was not provided.

Results

Apnea was observed for 10 to 30 seconds after propofol administration, which induced a decrease in heart rate; however, the changes were not significant. Compared with baseline values, respiratory rate was significantly decreased at 4 minutes after administration of propofol and thereafter. Systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures decreased over the infusion period, but the changes were not significant. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased by 30% after 15 minutes of anesthesia; end-tidal CO2 concentration increased from baseline values after 30 minutes; PO2 was significantly decreased at 5 minutes after induction and thereafter; PCO2 was significantly (P< 0.05) increased after 15 minutes of anesthesia; and arterial oxygen saturation was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased at the end of anesthesia. Two male turkeys developed severe transient hypoxemia, 1 at 5 and the other at 15 minutes after induction. Time to standing after discontinuation of propofol infusion was 11 ± 6 minutes. Recovery was smooth and unremarkable.

Conclusion

Propofol is an effective agent for IV induction and maintenance of anesthesia in wild turkeys, and is useful for short procedures or where the use of inhalational agents is contraindicated. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1014–1017)

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