Cardiorespiratory and metabolic effects of walking, standing, and standing with a splint during the recuperative period from maximal exercise in horses

J. A. E. Hubbell From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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K. W. Hinchcliff From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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W. W. Muir From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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J. T. Robertson From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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R. A. Sams From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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L. M. Schmall From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective

To determine the effects of walking, standing, or standing with a splint on 1 forelimb on rate of recuperation of horses after a brief, intense bout of exercise.

Animals

6 adult Thoroughbreds (435 to 542 kg).

Procedure

Horses were preconditioned by exercise on a treadmill to establish a uniform level of fitness. Once fit, the treadmill speed causing each horse to exercise at 120% of its maximal oxygen consumption was determined and was used in simulated races at 14-day intervals. Horses were instrumented for collection of arterial and mixed venous blood samples for measurement of acid-base status, concentrations of metabolites, and cardiopulmonary indices. The horses were exercised at a speed inducing 120% of their maximal oxygen consumption until fatigued or for a maximum of 2 minutes. Three recuperative interventions were evaluated: walking at 1.8 m/s for 30 minutes, then standing for the remainder of the 90-minute trial; standing stationary for 90 minutes; and standing stationary for 90 minutes with a splint on the right forelimb.

Results

Walking significantly increased cardiac output during the recuperative phase and hastened recovery of normal acid-base status and return of blood lactate concentration to baseline values.

Conclusion

Limiting movement of horses during the recuperative period delays recovery from maximal exercise. Most measured indices returned to baseline by 60 minutes after exercise. All measured cardiopulmonary indices returned to baseline values by 90 minutes after exercise.

Clinical Relevance

Horses that are not allowed to walk during recuperation from exercise may have a prolonged recovery period. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1003–1009)

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effects of walking, standing, or standing with a splint on 1 forelimb on rate of recuperation of horses after a brief, intense bout of exercise.

Animals

6 adult Thoroughbreds (435 to 542 kg).

Procedure

Horses were preconditioned by exercise on a treadmill to establish a uniform level of fitness. Once fit, the treadmill speed causing each horse to exercise at 120% of its maximal oxygen consumption was determined and was used in simulated races at 14-day intervals. Horses were instrumented for collection of arterial and mixed venous blood samples for measurement of acid-base status, concentrations of metabolites, and cardiopulmonary indices. The horses were exercised at a speed inducing 120% of their maximal oxygen consumption until fatigued or for a maximum of 2 minutes. Three recuperative interventions were evaluated: walking at 1.8 m/s for 30 minutes, then standing for the remainder of the 90-minute trial; standing stationary for 90 minutes; and standing stationary for 90 minutes with a splint on the right forelimb.

Results

Walking significantly increased cardiac output during the recuperative phase and hastened recovery of normal acid-base status and return of blood lactate concentration to baseline values.

Conclusion

Limiting movement of horses during the recuperative period delays recovery from maximal exercise. Most measured indices returned to baseline by 60 minutes after exercise. All measured cardiopulmonary indices returned to baseline values by 90 minutes after exercise.

Clinical Relevance

Horses that are not allowed to walk during recuperation from exercise may have a prolonged recovery period. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1003–1009)

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