Diversity of Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus ribotypes recovered from New York dairy herds

Ariel L. Rivas From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Ariel L. Rivas in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Rubén N. González From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Rubén N. González in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPVM, PhD
,
Martin Wiedmann From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Martin Wiedmann in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 Dr med vet
,
James L. Bruce From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by James L. Bruce in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Eileen M. Cole From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Eileen M. Cole in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Gary J. Bennett From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Gary J. Bennett in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Hal F. Schulte III From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Hal F. Schulte III in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
David J. Wilson From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by David J. Wilson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Hussni O. Mohammed From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Hussni O. Mohammed in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD
, and
Carl A. Batt From Quality Milk Promotion Services (Rivas, González, Bennett, Schulte, Wilson), and the Department of Clinical Sciences (Mohammed), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (Wiedmann, Batt); and Qualicon (a subsidiary of EI du Pont de Nemours), Wilmington, DE 19880-0357 (Bruce, Cole).

Search for other papers by Carl A. Batt in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objectives

To develop a reference database for characterization of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae strains by automated ribotyping and to use it to assess the discriminatory power of this typing procedure and the geographic distribution of Sta aureus and Str agalactiae strains in New York state dairy herds.

Sample Population

22 commercial dairy herds.

Procedure

Isolates of Sta aureus and Str agalactiae from bovine milk were identified by standard bacteriologic procedures, then typed by automated ribotyping. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was tested in vitro. Two indicators made from the data were percentage of farms with multiple ribotypes and percentage of single ribotypes found in several geographic regions. Standard bacteriologic diagnosis, automated ribotyping, and determination of antibiograms (Kirby-Bauer method) also were done.

Results

Of 50 Sta aureus and 44 Str agalactiae isolates from composite milk samples of 12 and 10 herds, respectively, 18 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, were identified. The discriminatory power of automated ribotyping was approximately 0.96 (Hunter-Gaston's formula). A higher percentage of herds with Sta aureus had multiple ribotypes. The most common Sta aureus ribotypes tended to have broader geographic distribution. Some Sta aureus ribotypes were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance profiles.

Conclusions

Automated ribotyping appears to characterize bovine strains of bacteria associated with intramammary infections with a high discriminatory index. Potential applications include identification of strains that appear to have broad geographic distribution suggesting interfarm transfer, discrimination between recurrent versus new intramammary infections (ie, for control of Str agalactiae and Sta aureus), and evaluation of antibiotic therapy. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:482–487)

Abstract

Objectives

To develop a reference database for characterization of bovine Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae strains by automated ribotyping and to use it to assess the discriminatory power of this typing procedure and the geographic distribution of Sta aureus and Str agalactiae strains in New York state dairy herds.

Sample Population

22 commercial dairy herds.

Procedure

Isolates of Sta aureus and Str agalactiae from bovine milk were identified by standard bacteriologic procedures, then typed by automated ribotyping. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was tested in vitro. Two indicators made from the data were percentage of farms with multiple ribotypes and percentage of single ribotypes found in several geographic regions. Standard bacteriologic diagnosis, automated ribotyping, and determination of antibiograms (Kirby-Bauer method) also were done.

Results

Of 50 Sta aureus and 44 Str agalactiae isolates from composite milk samples of 12 and 10 herds, respectively, 18 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, were identified. The discriminatory power of automated ribotyping was approximately 0.96 (Hunter-Gaston's formula). A higher percentage of herds with Sta aureus had multiple ribotypes. The most common Sta aureus ribotypes tended to have broader geographic distribution. Some Sta aureus ribotypes were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance profiles.

Conclusions

Automated ribotyping appears to characterize bovine strains of bacteria associated with intramammary infections with a high discriminatory index. Potential applications include identification of strains that appear to have broad geographic distribution suggesting interfarm transfer, discrimination between recurrent versus new intramammary infections (ie, for control of Str agalactiae and Sta aureus), and evaluation of antibiotic therapy. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:482–487)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 85 85 44
PDF Downloads 26 26 2
Advertisement