Stability of γ-glutamyltransferase activity in calf sera after refrigerated or frozen storage

Fred Muller From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Jeff W. Tyler From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Steven M. Parish From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Kristen A. Johnson From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Denise S. Krytenberg From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Leilani K. Wilson From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Muller, Tyler, Parish, Krytenberg, Wilson) and Animal Sciences (Johnson), Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Abstract

Objectives

To examine stability of -glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity in stored serum from neonatal calves.

Animals

10 commercial beef calves between 36 and 60 hours old.

Procedure

Serum samples were obtained from the calves, and each sample was divided into 8 aliquots. Serum GGT activity was measured on day 0 (fresh) and days 1, 2, 3, and 4 of refrigerated storage (4 C) and weeks 1, 2, and 3 of frozen storage (−20 C).

Results

Serum GGT activities for each of the refrigerated aliquots did not significantly differ from day zero, with serum GGT activity (expressed as a percentage of initial activity) > 99% on all 4 days. Serum GGT activity in frozen aliquots decreased significantly after 1 and 2 weeks of frozen storage, 97 and 98%, respectively; however, this decrease in GGT activity was not biologically significant. The observed GGT activity did not decrease significantly in the samples stored frozen for 3 weeks; these samples retained 99% of initial activity.

Conclusion

The observed stability of serum GGT activity indicates that serum may be obtained, stored, and batch processed at a later time. This stability during storage is important to the success of a bovine passive transfer monitoring program based on GGT activity. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:354-355)

Abstract

Objectives

To examine stability of -glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity in stored serum from neonatal calves.

Animals

10 commercial beef calves between 36 and 60 hours old.

Procedure

Serum samples were obtained from the calves, and each sample was divided into 8 aliquots. Serum GGT activity was measured on day 0 (fresh) and days 1, 2, 3, and 4 of refrigerated storage (4 C) and weeks 1, 2, and 3 of frozen storage (−20 C).

Results

Serum GGT activities for each of the refrigerated aliquots did not significantly differ from day zero, with serum GGT activity (expressed as a percentage of initial activity) > 99% on all 4 days. Serum GGT activity in frozen aliquots decreased significantly after 1 and 2 weeks of frozen storage, 97 and 98%, respectively; however, this decrease in GGT activity was not biologically significant. The observed GGT activity did not decrease significantly in the samples stored frozen for 3 weeks; these samples retained 99% of initial activity.

Conclusion

The observed stability of serum GGT activity indicates that serum may be obtained, stored, and batch processed at a later time. This stability during storage is important to the success of a bovine passive transfer monitoring program based on GGT activity. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:354-355)

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