Effects of temperature on hematologic and serum biochemical profiles of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops × Morone saxatilis)

Terry C. Hrubec From the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

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John L. Robertson From the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

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Stephen A. Smith From the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

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Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effect of water temperature on hematologic and biochemical analytes in hybrid striped bass.

Animals

Hybrid striped bass (reciprocal cross; female Morone chrysops × male M saxatilis) maintained in 2,000-L tanks with undergravel filters.

Procedure

Fish were acclimated to 10. 18, 24, and 29 C water for 6 weeks prior to sample collection. Hematologic and serum biochemical profiles were then determined. Values were compared among the various temperatures, and with reference intervals previously determined.

Results

Most values were within or slightly outside the established reference intervals. The following analytes deviated notably from the reference interval: leukocyte, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were lower than the reference intervals at 10 C; glucose values were lower at 10 and 18 C; calcium values were higher at 10 and 18 C; and total protein, albumin, globulin, and chloride values were higher at 29 C.

Conclusion

Separate reference intervals should be developed for analytes which, because of temperature, deviate notably from the reference interval. Modifications of the established reference intervals, by including fish from varied temperatures, should allow use of one reference interval for analytes, with only slight variation attributable to temperature.

Clinical Relevance

Determining the effects of temperature on the hematologic and biochemical values helps develop clinical pathology as a diagnostic tool in fish. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:126–130)

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effect of water temperature on hematologic and biochemical analytes in hybrid striped bass.

Animals

Hybrid striped bass (reciprocal cross; female Morone chrysops × male M saxatilis) maintained in 2,000-L tanks with undergravel filters.

Procedure

Fish were acclimated to 10. 18, 24, and 29 C water for 6 weeks prior to sample collection. Hematologic and serum biochemical profiles were then determined. Values were compared among the various temperatures, and with reference intervals previously determined.

Results

Most values were within or slightly outside the established reference intervals. The following analytes deviated notably from the reference interval: leukocyte, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were lower than the reference intervals at 10 C; glucose values were lower at 10 and 18 C; calcium values were higher at 10 and 18 C; and total protein, albumin, globulin, and chloride values were higher at 29 C.

Conclusion

Separate reference intervals should be developed for analytes which, because of temperature, deviate notably from the reference interval. Modifications of the established reference intervals, by including fish from varied temperatures, should allow use of one reference interval for analytes, with only slight variation attributable to temperature.

Clinical Relevance

Determining the effects of temperature on the hematologic and biochemical values helps develop clinical pathology as a diagnostic tool in fish. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:126–130)

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