Fibrinolytic activity in dogs after surgically induced trauma

Anne Lanevschi From the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, J2S 7C6 (Lanevschi), and Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kramer, Greene) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Meyers), College of Veterinary Medicine, Pullman, WA 99164.

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John W. Kramer From the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, J2S 7C6 (Lanevschi), and Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kramer, Greene) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Meyers), College of Veterinary Medicine, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Stephen A. Greene From the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, J2S 7C6 (Lanevschi), and Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kramer, Greene) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Meyers), College of Veterinary Medicine, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Kenneth M. Meyers From the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, J2S 7C6 (Lanevschi), and Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kramer, Greene) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Meyers), College of Veterinary Medicine, Pullman, WA 99164.

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Abstract

Objective

To determine whether alterations in the fibrinolytic pathway analytes, plasminogen (PLG), tissue plasminogen activator, and α2-antiplasmin are significant in dogs subjected to minor and major surgical trauma.

Animals

18 dogs in 3 groups of 6 each.

Procedure

Plasma fibrinolytic pathway analytes were measured in dogs with trauma of ovariohysterectomy (minor trauma) or orthopedic surgery (major trauma) and halothane anesthesia (control group). A commercial procedure adapted to a microtitration plate was used to measure the analytes. Blood was obtained 24 hours before anesthesia, at extubation (0 hours), and again at 2, 24, and 48 hours after extubation. An analyte quality-control strategy was maintained.

Results

In the major trauma group, there was a significant, transient, postsurgical decrease in PLG activity at 0 and 24 hours and a return to presurgical values by 48 hours. The minor trauma group had a similar trend without significant changes, including an increase in PLG values at 48 hours that exceeded the reference range. Antiplasmin values changed significantly in the major trauma group only. Tissue plasminogen activator values remained within the reference range.

Conclusions

Tissue plasminogen activator was not considered a clinical marker of interest for detection of alterations in fibrinolysis after trauma. In contrast, plasma PLG and α2-antiplasmin values may be useful in the evaluation of hemostatic complications of surgery.

Clinical Relevance

Identification of altered fibrinolysis in dogs undergoing traumatic surgery may provide a baseline for preventive pre- and postsurgical hemostatic care. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1137-1140)

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether alterations in the fibrinolytic pathway analytes, plasminogen (PLG), tissue plasminogen activator, and α2-antiplasmin are significant in dogs subjected to minor and major surgical trauma.

Animals

18 dogs in 3 groups of 6 each.

Procedure

Plasma fibrinolytic pathway analytes were measured in dogs with trauma of ovariohysterectomy (minor trauma) or orthopedic surgery (major trauma) and halothane anesthesia (control group). A commercial procedure adapted to a microtitration plate was used to measure the analytes. Blood was obtained 24 hours before anesthesia, at extubation (0 hours), and again at 2, 24, and 48 hours after extubation. An analyte quality-control strategy was maintained.

Results

In the major trauma group, there was a significant, transient, postsurgical decrease in PLG activity at 0 and 24 hours and a return to presurgical values by 48 hours. The minor trauma group had a similar trend without significant changes, including an increase in PLG values at 48 hours that exceeded the reference range. Antiplasmin values changed significantly in the major trauma group only. Tissue plasminogen activator values remained within the reference range.

Conclusions

Tissue plasminogen activator was not considered a clinical marker of interest for detection of alterations in fibrinolysis after trauma. In contrast, plasma PLG and α2-antiplasmin values may be useful in the evaluation of hemostatic complications of surgery.

Clinical Relevance

Identification of altered fibrinolysis in dogs undergoing traumatic surgery may provide a baseline for preventive pre- and postsurgical hemostatic care. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1137-1140)

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