Apparent viscosity of the synovial fluid from mid-carpal, tibiotarsal, and distal interphalangeal joints of horses

Jonathan M. Lumsden From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Lumsden, Caron) and Laboratory for Comparative Orthopaedic Research (Arnoczky), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Agricultural Engineering (Steffe, Briggs), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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 BVSc, MS
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John P. Caron From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Lumsden, Caron) and Laboratory for Comparative Orthopaedic Research (Arnoczky), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Agricultural Engineering (Steffe, Briggs), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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 DVM, MVSc
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James F. Steffe From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Lumsden, Caron) and Laboratory for Comparative Orthopaedic Research (Arnoczky), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Agricultural Engineering (Steffe, Briggs), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Jenni L. Briggs From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Lumsden, Caron) and Laboratory for Comparative Orthopaedic Research (Arnoczky), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Agricultural Engineering (Steffe, Briggs), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Stephen P. Arnoczky From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Lumsden, Caron) and Laboratory for Comparative Orthopaedic Research (Arnoczky), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Agricultural Engineering (Steffe, Briggs), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Abstract

Objective

To compare the apparent viscosity of normal synovial fluid of the mid-carpal, tibiotarsal, and interphalangeal joints of horses.

Design

Viscosity evaluation over a range of shear rates was used to characterize the apparent viscosity of synovial fluids from the 3 joints.

Animals

60 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedure

Viscosity data for synovial fluid samples were obtained over a shear rate range of 10 to 250/s and apparent viscosity was calculated at 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250/s. Effect of shear rate on apparent viscosity was determined, using a two-way ANOVA, with significant differences tested, using a Tukey's test at a significance level of P < 0.05.

Results

Synovial fluid from all these joints indicated shear thinning behavior: decreased apparent viscosity with increased shear rate. Apparent viscosity of synovial fluid from the 3 joints was not significantly different over the shear rate range of 50 to 250/s.

Conclusion

Results of this study indicate that the apparent viscosity of the distal interphalangeal joint is not less than that of other joints, as has been reported.

Clinical Relevance

The observation of decreased synovial fluid viscosity of distal interphalangeal joint fluid should be considered as suggestive of joint disease. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:879–883)

Abstract

Objective

To compare the apparent viscosity of normal synovial fluid of the mid-carpal, tibiotarsal, and interphalangeal joints of horses.

Design

Viscosity evaluation over a range of shear rates was used to characterize the apparent viscosity of synovial fluids from the 3 joints.

Animals

60 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedure

Viscosity data for synovial fluid samples were obtained over a shear rate range of 10 to 250/s and apparent viscosity was calculated at 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250/s. Effect of shear rate on apparent viscosity was determined, using a two-way ANOVA, with significant differences tested, using a Tukey's test at a significance level of P < 0.05.

Results

Synovial fluid from all these joints indicated shear thinning behavior: decreased apparent viscosity with increased shear rate. Apparent viscosity of synovial fluid from the 3 joints was not significantly different over the shear rate range of 50 to 250/s.

Conclusion

Results of this study indicate that the apparent viscosity of the distal interphalangeal joint is not less than that of other joints, as has been reported.

Clinical Relevance

The observation of decreased synovial fluid viscosity of distal interphalangeal joint fluid should be considered as suggestive of joint disease. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:879–883)

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