Use of force-plate analysis of gait to compare two surgical techniques for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs

Dermot J. Jevens From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Dermot J. Jevens in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MVB
,
Charles E. DeCamp From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Charles E. DeCamp in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Joe Hauptman From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Joe Hauptman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Terrance D. Braden From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Terrance D. Braden in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Marlee Richter From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Marlee Richter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Rachel Robinson From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Rachel Robinson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective

To use ground reaction forces and related impulses as an objective measurement of limb function in the comparison of 1 extracapsular and 1 intracapsular surgical technique for repair of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs.

Animals

18 healthy dogs.

Design

All dogs underwent force-plate analysis of gait prior to transection of the left cranial cruciate ligament. The dogs were randomly allotted to 3 groups. The ligamentous instability was corrected, using a modified retinacular imbrication technique (MRIT) in 1 group and an under-and-over technique in another group. No attempt was made to correct the ligamentous instability in a control group. Clinical grading of lameness and force-plate analysis of gait were performed at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks after surgery.

Procedure

Peak vertical force and vertical, braking, and propulsion impulses were recorded for each limb at each time. The degree of clinical lameness was graded at each time.

Results

Left hind limb peak vertical forces and vertical impulses were significantly decreased at all times after surgery in the control and under-and-over technique group, compared with values before surgery. Dogs of the MRIT group had improved by 20 weeks, with no significant differences between left hind limb peak vertical forces or vertical impulses recorded before surgery and at 20 weeks.

Conclusion

Peak vertical forces and vertical impulses in dogs undergoing MRIT repair after experimentally created cranial cruciate ligament rupture are not significantly different when values recorded for the operated limb at 20 weeks after surgery are compared with those recorded prior to surgery.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:389-393)

Abstract

Objective

To use ground reaction forces and related impulses as an objective measurement of limb function in the comparison of 1 extracapsular and 1 intracapsular surgical technique for repair of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs.

Animals

18 healthy dogs.

Design

All dogs underwent force-plate analysis of gait prior to transection of the left cranial cruciate ligament. The dogs were randomly allotted to 3 groups. The ligamentous instability was corrected, using a modified retinacular imbrication technique (MRIT) in 1 group and an under-and-over technique in another group. No attempt was made to correct the ligamentous instability in a control group. Clinical grading of lameness and force-plate analysis of gait were performed at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks after surgery.

Procedure

Peak vertical force and vertical, braking, and propulsion impulses were recorded for each limb at each time. The degree of clinical lameness was graded at each time.

Results

Left hind limb peak vertical forces and vertical impulses were significantly decreased at all times after surgery in the control and under-and-over technique group, compared with values before surgery. Dogs of the MRIT group had improved by 20 weeks, with no significant differences between left hind limb peak vertical forces or vertical impulses recorded before surgery and at 20 weeks.

Conclusion

Peak vertical forces and vertical impulses in dogs undergoing MRIT repair after experimentally created cranial cruciate ligament rupture are not significantly different when values recorded for the operated limb at 20 weeks after surgery are compared with those recorded prior to surgery.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:389-393)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 102 102 38
PDF Downloads 46 46 8
Advertisement