Influence of four diets on uric acid metabolism and endogenous acid production in healthy Beagles

Joseph W. Bartges From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Carl A. Osborne From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Lawrence J. Felice From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Lisa K. Unger From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Lori A. Koehler From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Kathy A. Bird From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Menglan Chen From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Unger, Koehler, Bird) and Laboratory for Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the influence of 3 diets used to dissolve or prevent ammonium urate uroliths in dogs, and a diet formulated for growth, on 24-hour excretions of uric acid, ammonia, net acid, titratable acid, bicarbonate, and creatinine: 24-hour urine volumes: pH values of 24-hour urine samples; plasma uric acid concentration; serum creatinine concentration; and endogenous creatinine clearance values.

Design

Randomized block.

Animals

Six reproductively intact female Beagles, 3.9 to 4.2 years old, weighing 8.5 to 11.1 kg.

Procedures

Four diets were evaluated for their ability to dissolve magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (struvite) uroliths (diet S); to minimize uric acid excretion (diet U); to minimize clinical signs associated with renal failure (diet K); and to promote growth in pups (diet P). Each diet was fed for 14 days; then 24-hour urine samples were collected. An adult maintenance diet was fed during a 7-day washout period.

Results

Consumption of diet U was associated with lowest plasma uric acid concentration, lowest 24-hour urinary uric acid, ammonia, titratable acid, and net acid excretions, lowest endogenous creatinine clearance values, highest 24-hour urinary bicarbonate excretion and urine pH values, and highest 24-hour urine volumes. Consumption of diet P was associated with opposite results; results of consumption of diets S and K were intermediate between those for diets U and P.

Conclusion

Consumption of diet U by healthy Beagles is associated with reduced magnitude of urinary excretion of uric acid and ammonia, with alkaluria, and with polyuria, which may be beneficial in the management of ammonium urate uroliths in dogs.

Clinical Relevance

Results support use of diet U for management of ammonium urate urolithiasis in dogs.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:324-328)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the influence of 3 diets used to dissolve or prevent ammonium urate uroliths in dogs, and a diet formulated for growth, on 24-hour excretions of uric acid, ammonia, net acid, titratable acid, bicarbonate, and creatinine: 24-hour urine volumes: pH values of 24-hour urine samples; plasma uric acid concentration; serum creatinine concentration; and endogenous creatinine clearance values.

Design

Randomized block.

Animals

Six reproductively intact female Beagles, 3.9 to 4.2 years old, weighing 8.5 to 11.1 kg.

Procedures

Four diets were evaluated for their ability to dissolve magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (struvite) uroliths (diet S); to minimize uric acid excretion (diet U); to minimize clinical signs associated with renal failure (diet K); and to promote growth in pups (diet P). Each diet was fed for 14 days; then 24-hour urine samples were collected. An adult maintenance diet was fed during a 7-day washout period.

Results

Consumption of diet U was associated with lowest plasma uric acid concentration, lowest 24-hour urinary uric acid, ammonia, titratable acid, and net acid excretions, lowest endogenous creatinine clearance values, highest 24-hour urinary bicarbonate excretion and urine pH values, and highest 24-hour urine volumes. Consumption of diet P was associated with opposite results; results of consumption of diets S and K were intermediate between those for diets U and P.

Conclusion

Consumption of diet U by healthy Beagles is associated with reduced magnitude of urinary excretion of uric acid and ammonia, with alkaluria, and with polyuria, which may be beneficial in the management of ammonium urate uroliths in dogs.

Clinical Relevance

Results support use of diet U for management of ammonium urate urolithiasis in dogs.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:324-328)

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