Plasma, urine, and synovial fluid disposition of methylprednisolone acetate and isoflupredone acetate after intra-articular administration in horses

J. D. Lillich From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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A. L. Bertone From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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L. M. Schmall From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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A. J. Ruggles From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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R. A. Sams From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective

To document plasma, urine, and synovial fluid disposition of 2 common intra-articularly administered steroid preparations, methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and isoflupredone acetate (IPA).

Design

Descriptive investigation.

Sample Population

100 mg of MPA or 4 mg of IPA was administered to 2 groups of 4 healthy sound radiographically normal female horses.

Procedure

Blood samples were collected at time 0 (before) and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours after administration of the designated steroid. Complete urine collection for measurement of designated steroid was accomplished by use of occluding 28-F balloon catheters. Synovial fluid samples were aseptically aspirated from the injected and contralateral uninjected tarsocrural joint at time 0 and 8, 24, 48, 240, and 672 hours after administration of the designated steroid. All samples were screened by ELISA to detect parent drug or metabolite equivalent, with a sensitivity of 2.5 ng/ml for MPA and 0.1 ng/ml for IPA. If drug was detected by ELISA in the plasma or synovial fluid, the samples were further quantified and specified, using HPLC with a lower limit of quantification (10 ng/ml).

Results

Between 2 and 12 hours after administration, plasma contained < 10 ng of MPA or IPA/ml (parent drug or metabolite equivalent), as intermittently detected by ELISA. Parent drug or metabolite equivalent was detected in the urine for 24 and 72 hours after injection of IPA and MPA, respectively. Synovial fluid from the contralateral joint contained no detectable MPA or IPA at any sample collection time. Median half-life for MPA, as detected by HPLC, was 10.3 hours (range, 6.1 to 10.6) in the synovial space. Median half-life for methylprednisolone, as detected by HPLC, was 10.4 (range, 9.9 to 32.1) hours.

Conclusions

Both steroids appeared to be rapidly hydrolyzed to their respective ester forms, as detected by HPLC. The ELISA appeared to be a useful screening tool for detection of corticosteroids in this variety of body fluids.

Abstract

Objective

To document plasma, urine, and synovial fluid disposition of 2 common intra-articularly administered steroid preparations, methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) and isoflupredone acetate (IPA).

Design

Descriptive investigation.

Sample Population

100 mg of MPA or 4 mg of IPA was administered to 2 groups of 4 healthy sound radiographically normal female horses.

Procedure

Blood samples were collected at time 0 (before) and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours after administration of the designated steroid. Complete urine collection for measurement of designated steroid was accomplished by use of occluding 28-F balloon catheters. Synovial fluid samples were aseptically aspirated from the injected and contralateral uninjected tarsocrural joint at time 0 and 8, 24, 48, 240, and 672 hours after administration of the designated steroid. All samples were screened by ELISA to detect parent drug or metabolite equivalent, with a sensitivity of 2.5 ng/ml for MPA and 0.1 ng/ml for IPA. If drug was detected by ELISA in the plasma or synovial fluid, the samples were further quantified and specified, using HPLC with a lower limit of quantification (10 ng/ml).

Results

Between 2 and 12 hours after administration, plasma contained < 10 ng of MPA or IPA/ml (parent drug or metabolite equivalent), as intermittently detected by ELISA. Parent drug or metabolite equivalent was detected in the urine for 24 and 72 hours after injection of IPA and MPA, respectively. Synovial fluid from the contralateral joint contained no detectable MPA or IPA at any sample collection time. Median half-life for MPA, as detected by HPLC, was 10.3 hours (range, 6.1 to 10.6) in the synovial space. Median half-life for methylprednisolone, as detected by HPLC, was 10.4 (range, 9.9 to 32.1) hours.

Conclusions

Both steroids appeared to be rapidly hydrolyzed to their respective ester forms, as detected by HPLC. The ELISA appeared to be a useful screening tool for detection of corticosteroids in this variety of body fluids.

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