Effect of craniectomy, durotomy, and wound closure on intracranial pressure in healthy cats

Michael L. Harrington From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Rodney S. Bagley From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Michael P. Moore From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Jeff W. Tyler From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Abstract

Objectives

To establish intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements in healthy cats under isoflurane anesthesia, using a fiberoptic monitoring system; to assess brain lesions associated with such monitoring; and to determine whether decompressive intracranial surgery decreases ICP in healthy cats.

Animals

6 healthy cats.

Procedure

Craniectomy and durotomy were performed, and the effect of these procedures on ICP was determined. ICP was monitored by use of a fiberoptic monitoring system. Gross and microscopic evaluations of brain tissues were performed after data collection.

Results

ICP decreased significantly after craniotomy and durotomy. After wound closure, ICP remained significantly reduced relative to initial pressures. However, postsurgical pressures were significantly increased, compared with those associated with ICP after durotomy. Gross and histologic abnormalities associated with placement of the ICP monitoring cable included mild focal acute hemorrhage and mechanical cortical disruption.

Conclusions

Craniectomy and durotomy significantly decreased ICP in healthy cats. ICP increased after wound closure, but remained significantly lower than initial pressures.

Clinical Relevance

Craniectomy and durotomy may be used to decrease ICP in cats. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1659–1661)

Abstract

Objectives

To establish intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements in healthy cats under isoflurane anesthesia, using a fiberoptic monitoring system; to assess brain lesions associated with such monitoring; and to determine whether decompressive intracranial surgery decreases ICP in healthy cats.

Animals

6 healthy cats.

Procedure

Craniectomy and durotomy were performed, and the effect of these procedures on ICP was determined. ICP was monitored by use of a fiberoptic monitoring system. Gross and microscopic evaluations of brain tissues were performed after data collection.

Results

ICP decreased significantly after craniotomy and durotomy. After wound closure, ICP remained significantly reduced relative to initial pressures. However, postsurgical pressures were significantly increased, compared with those associated with ICP after durotomy. Gross and histologic abnormalities associated with placement of the ICP monitoring cable included mild focal acute hemorrhage and mechanical cortical disruption.

Conclusions

Craniectomy and durotomy significantly decreased ICP in healthy cats. ICP increased after wound closure, but remained significantly lower than initial pressures.

Clinical Relevance

Craniectomy and durotomy may be used to decrease ICP in cats. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1659–1661)

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