Comparison of methods for estimation of Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibody production in the aqueous humor of cats

Steven L. Hill From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Michael R. Lappin From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Jane Carman From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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James K. Collins From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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John S. Reif From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Melissa Spilker From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Colleen Jensen From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Hill, Lappin, Spilker, Jensen) and Environmental Health (Reif), and the Diagnostic Laboratory (Carman, Collins), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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SUMMARY

Intraocular production of Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibody in cats has been estimated by comparing the ratio of T gondii-specific antibody in aqueous humor and serum with the ratio of total immunoglobulins in serum and aqueous humor (Goldmann-Witmer coefficient; aqueous antibody coefficient; C value). It has been proposed that in human beings, comparison of the ratio of T gondii-specific antibody in aqueous humor and serum with the ratio of antibodies against a nonocular pathogen in serum and aqueous humor is more accurate than methods using total immunoglobulin quantification. We developed an elisa for detection of calicivirus-specific antibodies in the serum and aqueous humor of cats. By evaluating calicivirus-specific antibody concentrations in the aqueous humor of healthy and diseased cats, calicivirus was assessed as a nonintraocular pathogen. The ratio of T gondii-specific antibodies in the aqueous humor and serum and the ratio of calicivirus-specific antibodies in serum and aqueous humor were evaluated as a means of estimating intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production.

A field strain of feline calicivirus was isolated, cultured, and purified. A calicivirus-specific IgG elisa was developed for detection of feline calicivirus-specific IgG in serum and aqueous humor. Calicivirus-specific IgG was measured in the serum and aqueous humor from 3 groups of control cats. Results suggested that calicivirus is a nonintraocular pathogen in cats and that calicivirus IgG detected in aqueous humor is attributable to leakage across a damaged blood-ocular barrier.

Intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibodies was estimated, using 2 formulas. The C value was calculated by multiplying the ratio of T gondii-specific IgM or IgG in aqueous humor and serum by the ratio of total immunoglobulins (using the corresponding IgM or IgG class) in serum and aqueous humor. The C tc value (Toxoplasma-calicivirus Goldmann-Witmer coefficient) was calculated by multiplying the ratio of T gondii-specific IgM or IgG in aqueous humor and serum by the ratio of calicivirus-specific IgG in serum and aqueous humor.

Serum and aqueous humor samples were obtained from 41 client-owned cats with uveitis, and T gondii-specific C values and Ctc values were calculated. Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgM or IgG C values of 10 or greater or T gondii-specific IgM or IgG Ctc values of 1 or greater were considered to be suggestive of intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production. Of the 41 cats, 20 (48.7%) had evidence of intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibody on the basis of either an IgM or IgG C value of 10 or greater. A Ctc value could not be calculated in 3 cats because calicivirus-specific IgG was not present in aqueous humor. Of the 38 cats for which Ctc values could be calculated, 25 (65.8 %) had evidence of intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibody on the basis of either an IgM or IgG Ctc value of 1 or greater. The C values and Ctc values were in agreement for 75.9 % of IgM containing samples and 75% of IgG containing samples. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of a positive test result, and predictive value of a negative test result for an IgM or IgG C value, when compared with the corresponding IgM or IgG Ctc value were determined. The results indicate that use of the C value for estimation of intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production will result in 28.6 (IgM) to 50 % (IgG) false-negative results and 12.5% (IgM and IgG) false-positive results, when compared with the Ctc value.

SUMMARY

Intraocular production of Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibody in cats has been estimated by comparing the ratio of T gondii-specific antibody in aqueous humor and serum with the ratio of total immunoglobulins in serum and aqueous humor (Goldmann-Witmer coefficient; aqueous antibody coefficient; C value). It has been proposed that in human beings, comparison of the ratio of T gondii-specific antibody in aqueous humor and serum with the ratio of antibodies against a nonocular pathogen in serum and aqueous humor is more accurate than methods using total immunoglobulin quantification. We developed an elisa for detection of calicivirus-specific antibodies in the serum and aqueous humor of cats. By evaluating calicivirus-specific antibody concentrations in the aqueous humor of healthy and diseased cats, calicivirus was assessed as a nonintraocular pathogen. The ratio of T gondii-specific antibodies in the aqueous humor and serum and the ratio of calicivirus-specific antibodies in serum and aqueous humor were evaluated as a means of estimating intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production.

A field strain of feline calicivirus was isolated, cultured, and purified. A calicivirus-specific IgG elisa was developed for detection of feline calicivirus-specific IgG in serum and aqueous humor. Calicivirus-specific IgG was measured in the serum and aqueous humor from 3 groups of control cats. Results suggested that calicivirus is a nonintraocular pathogen in cats and that calicivirus IgG detected in aqueous humor is attributable to leakage across a damaged blood-ocular barrier.

Intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibodies was estimated, using 2 formulas. The C value was calculated by multiplying the ratio of T gondii-specific IgM or IgG in aqueous humor and serum by the ratio of total immunoglobulins (using the corresponding IgM or IgG class) in serum and aqueous humor. The C tc value (Toxoplasma-calicivirus Goldmann-Witmer coefficient) was calculated by multiplying the ratio of T gondii-specific IgM or IgG in aqueous humor and serum by the ratio of calicivirus-specific IgG in serum and aqueous humor.

Serum and aqueous humor samples were obtained from 41 client-owned cats with uveitis, and T gondii-specific C values and Ctc values were calculated. Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgM or IgG C values of 10 or greater or T gondii-specific IgM or IgG Ctc values of 1 or greater were considered to be suggestive of intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production. Of the 41 cats, 20 (48.7%) had evidence of intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibody on the basis of either an IgM or IgG C value of 10 or greater. A Ctc value could not be calculated in 3 cats because calicivirus-specific IgG was not present in aqueous humor. Of the 38 cats for which Ctc values could be calculated, 25 (65.8 %) had evidence of intraocular production of T gondii-specific antibody on the basis of either an IgM or IgG Ctc value of 1 or greater. The C values and Ctc values were in agreement for 75.9 % of IgM containing samples and 75% of IgG containing samples. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of a positive test result, and predictive value of a negative test result for an IgM or IgG C value, when compared with the corresponding IgM or IgG Ctc value were determined. The results indicate that use of the C value for estimation of intraocular T gondii-specific antibody production will result in 28.6 (IgM) to 50 % (IgG) false-negative results and 12.5% (IgM and IgG) false-positive results, when compared with the Ctc value.

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