Effects of various risk factors on plasma protein and serum immunoglobulin concentrations of calves at postpartum hours 10 and 24

Louis J. Perino From the Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska (Perino), and the USDA-ARS, Roman L. Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center (Wittum, Ross), Clay Center, NE 68933.

Search for other papers by Louis J. Perino in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Thomas E. Wittum From the Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska (Perino), and the USDA-ARS, Roman L. Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center (Wittum, Ross), Clay Center, NE 68933.

Search for other papers by Thomas E. Wittum in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD;
, and
Gary S. Ross From the Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska (Perino), and the USDA-ARS, Roman L. Hruska US Meat Animal Research Center (Wittum, Ross), Clay Center, NE 68933.

Search for other papers by Gary S. Ross in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

In an attempt to identify important predictors of failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer (< 800 mg of IgG/dl), identify calves with failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer, and determine the effects of a colostrum supplement, blood samples were collected from 263 calves at postpartum hours 10 and 24. Calves of dams diagnosed with mastitis had lower mean plasma protein and IgG concentrations at 10 (P < 0.05) and 24 (P < 0.01) hours. Plasma protein and IgG concentrations were similar for single and twin calves at 10 hours, but IgG concentration at 24 hours was higher (P < 0.01) in twin calves. Calves born to dams that had dystocia had numerically lower mean plasma protein and IgG concentrations than did calves born to dams that had normal delivery. However, observed differences were small and, after adjustment for other important factors, these differences were not significant. Age of dam was associated with plasma protein (P < 0.05) and IgG (P < 0.10) concentrations at 10 hours, but had no effect at 24 hours. Plasma protein and IgG concentrations decreased as calves were born later in the calving season, although the association of birth date with IgG concentration at 24 hours was marginal (P = 0.07). Calf sex, dam body condition score, and birth weight were not related to plasma protein or IgG values. The sensitivity and specificity of a cutoff value of 4.8 g of protein/dl of plasma, measured at 10 hours, for diagnosing failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer at 10 hours were 78 and 94%, and for diagnosing failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer at 24 hours were 88 and 73%, respectively. A colostrum supplement administered to calves with low plasma protein concentration at 10 hours had no effect on plasma protein or IgG values at 24 hours or on pre-weaning morbidity and mortality.

SUMMARY

In an attempt to identify important predictors of failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer (< 800 mg of IgG/dl), identify calves with failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer, and determine the effects of a colostrum supplement, blood samples were collected from 263 calves at postpartum hours 10 and 24. Calves of dams diagnosed with mastitis had lower mean plasma protein and IgG concentrations at 10 (P < 0.05) and 24 (P < 0.01) hours. Plasma protein and IgG concentrations were similar for single and twin calves at 10 hours, but IgG concentration at 24 hours was higher (P < 0.01) in twin calves. Calves born to dams that had dystocia had numerically lower mean plasma protein and IgG concentrations than did calves born to dams that had normal delivery. However, observed differences were small and, after adjustment for other important factors, these differences were not significant. Age of dam was associated with plasma protein (P < 0.05) and IgG (P < 0.10) concentrations at 10 hours, but had no effect at 24 hours. Plasma protein and IgG concentrations decreased as calves were born later in the calving season, although the association of birth date with IgG concentration at 24 hours was marginal (P = 0.07). Calf sex, dam body condition score, and birth weight were not related to plasma protein or IgG values. The sensitivity and specificity of a cutoff value of 4.8 g of protein/dl of plasma, measured at 10 hours, for diagnosing failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer at 10 hours were 78 and 94%, and for diagnosing failure of passive immunoglobulin transfer at 24 hours were 88 and 73%, respectively. A colostrum supplement administered to calves with low plasma protein concentration at 10 hours had no effect on plasma protein or IgG values at 24 hours or on pre-weaning morbidity and mortality.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 121 121 14
PDF Downloads 38 38 1
Advertisement