Effects of three occlusive dressing materials on healing of full-thickness skin wounds in dogs

David T. Ramsey From the Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (Ramsey, Pope) and Veterinary Microbiology (Berg), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dalton Research Center (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, and the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Swaim).

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Eric R. Pope From the Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (Ramsey, Pope) and Veterinary Microbiology (Berg), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dalton Research Center (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, and the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Swaim).

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Colette Wagner-Mann From the Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (Ramsey, Pope) and Veterinary Microbiology (Berg), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dalton Research Center (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, and the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Swaim).

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John N. Berg From the Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (Ramsey, Pope) and Veterinary Microbiology (Berg), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dalton Research Center (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, and the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Swaim).

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Steven F. Swaim From the Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (Ramsey, Pope) and Veterinary Microbiology (Berg), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Dalton Research Center (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, and the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Swaim).

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SUMMARY

The effects of 3 occlusive dressing materials and a standard, nonadherent dressing material on healing of full-thickness skin defects were evaluated in dogs. Two wounds measuring 2 × 2 cm were created bilaterally (4 wounds/dog) on the dorsolateral aspect of the trunk of 12 Beagles. Wound treatments were evenly distributed between 4 sites, using a Latin square design. Treatments evaluated were: equine amnion (group A), biosynthetic hydrogel dressing (group B), transparent polyethylene sheeting (group T), and a semiocclusive rayon/polyethylene, nonadherent dressing (group C). Rates of contraction and epithelialization of group-A wounds were significantly greater than those of wounds of groups C, B, and T. On days 14, 21, and 28, mean percentage of wound contraction and mean percentage of total wound healed in group A exceeded those wounds in groups C, B, and T. On day 28, wounds in group A were significantly smaller than wounds in groups B and T, but were not significantly smaller than wounds in group C. All wounds in group A achieved 100% healing during the 28-day study period. Mean time for complete healing of group-A wounds was 21 days. The percentages of wounds completely healed by day 28 for groups B, C, and T were 25, 67, and 25%, respectively. Results indicate that use of equine amnion as an occlusive biological dressing on full-thickness wounds in dogs increases rate of healing.

SUMMARY

The effects of 3 occlusive dressing materials and a standard, nonadherent dressing material on healing of full-thickness skin defects were evaluated in dogs. Two wounds measuring 2 × 2 cm were created bilaterally (4 wounds/dog) on the dorsolateral aspect of the trunk of 12 Beagles. Wound treatments were evenly distributed between 4 sites, using a Latin square design. Treatments evaluated were: equine amnion (group A), biosynthetic hydrogel dressing (group B), transparent polyethylene sheeting (group T), and a semiocclusive rayon/polyethylene, nonadherent dressing (group C). Rates of contraction and epithelialization of group-A wounds were significantly greater than those of wounds of groups C, B, and T. On days 14, 21, and 28, mean percentage of wound contraction and mean percentage of total wound healed in group A exceeded those wounds in groups C, B, and T. On day 28, wounds in group A were significantly smaller than wounds in groups B and T, but were not significantly smaller than wounds in group C. All wounds in group A achieved 100% healing during the 28-day study period. Mean time for complete healing of group-A wounds was 21 days. The percentages of wounds completely healed by day 28 for groups B, C, and T were 25, 67, and 25%, respectively. Results indicate that use of equine amnion as an occlusive biological dressing on full-thickness wounds in dogs increases rate of healing.

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