Urethral pressure response to smooth and skeletal muscle relaxants in anesthetized, adult male cats with naturally acquired urethral obstruction

Ingrid M. Straeter-Knowlen From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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Steven L. Marks From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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Mark Rishniw From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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Robert C. Speth From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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W. Wirth From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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Grant G. Knowlen From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Straeter-Knowlen, Marks, Rishniw, Knowlen) and Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology, and Physiology (Speth), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany (Wirth).

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SUMMARY

The effects of the skeletal muscle-relaxing drug dantrolene sodium alone, and in combination with the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin, on the urethral pressure profile were investigated in male cats with obstructive lower urinary tract disease. Decreases in mean segmental intraurethral pressure induced by dantrolene (n = 3) or dantrolene in combination with prazosin (n = 3) were evaluated statistically, using a paired design. Statistical analysis was applied to absolute (mm of Hg) pressure values. Intravenous administration of dantrolene alone (1 mg/ kg of body weight, n = 3) significantly decreased pressure in the postprostatic/penile urethral segment, but did not decrease prostatic urethral pressures. Dantrolene in combination with prazosin (0.03 mg/kg, iv) caused a 20% pressure decrease in the prostatic segment (P = 0.060). Preprostatic urethral pressure was not significantly affected by either treatment regimen in the small pool of cats studied. There was no difference in baseline pressures (mm of Hg) in the 3 intraurethral segments of these 6 recently obstructed male cats, compared with historic baseline pressures (mm of Hg) in the 3 intraurethral segments of 28 healthy male cats.

These results indicate that dantrolene and prazosin may be effective in relaxing intraurethral skeletal and smooth musculature in male cats clinically afflicted with obstructive lower urinary tract disease. However, it is not certain that administration of muscle relaxants would facilitate urethral catheterization and removal of the obstruction in male cats with blockage of the lower urinary tract. Strikingly, results of this study suggest that urethral muscle spasm had a minor role in these cats.

SUMMARY

The effects of the skeletal muscle-relaxing drug dantrolene sodium alone, and in combination with the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin, on the urethral pressure profile were investigated in male cats with obstructive lower urinary tract disease. Decreases in mean segmental intraurethral pressure induced by dantrolene (n = 3) or dantrolene in combination with prazosin (n = 3) were evaluated statistically, using a paired design. Statistical analysis was applied to absolute (mm of Hg) pressure values. Intravenous administration of dantrolene alone (1 mg/ kg of body weight, n = 3) significantly decreased pressure in the postprostatic/penile urethral segment, but did not decrease prostatic urethral pressures. Dantrolene in combination with prazosin (0.03 mg/kg, iv) caused a 20% pressure decrease in the prostatic segment (P = 0.060). Preprostatic urethral pressure was not significantly affected by either treatment regimen in the small pool of cats studied. There was no difference in baseline pressures (mm of Hg) in the 3 intraurethral segments of these 6 recently obstructed male cats, compared with historic baseline pressures (mm of Hg) in the 3 intraurethral segments of 28 healthy male cats.

These results indicate that dantrolene and prazosin may be effective in relaxing intraurethral skeletal and smooth musculature in male cats clinically afflicted with obstructive lower urinary tract disease. However, it is not certain that administration of muscle relaxants would facilitate urethral catheterization and removal of the obstruction in male cats with blockage of the lower urinary tract. Strikingly, results of this study suggest that urethral muscle spasm had a minor role in these cats.

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