Influence of two amounts of dietary casein on uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate urinary activity product ratios of healthy Beagles

Joseph W. Bartges From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Carl A. Osborne From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Lawrence J. Felice From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Charles Brown From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Timothy A. Allen From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Lori Koehler From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Lisa Unger From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Kathy Bird From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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Menglan Chen From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Bartges, Osborne, Koehler, Unger, Bird) and Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Felice, Chen), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (Brown) 32610; and Mark Morris Institute, 5500 SW 7th St, Topeka, KS (Allen) 66601.

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SUMMARY

Casein has been used as a protein source in diets designed to dissolve canine ammonium urate uroliths and to prevent their recurrence, because it contains fewer purine precursors than do many other sources of protein. However, an important question is whether reduced quantities of dietary casein have any benefit in modifying saturation of urine with urates. To answer this question, activity productd ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were determined in 24-hour urine samples produced by 6 healthy Beagles during periods of consumption of a 10.4% protein, casein-based (10.4% casein) diet and a 20.8% protein, casein-based (20.8% casein) diet. Significantly lower activity product. ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Significantly lower 24-hour urinary excretions of ammonia and phosphorus were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretions of magnesium and 24-hour urine pH values were significantly higher when dogs were fed the 10.4% casein diet. These results suggest that use of the 10.4% casein diet in protocols designed for dissolution and prevention of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate uroliths in dogs may be beneficial.

SUMMARY

Casein has been used as a protein source in diets designed to dissolve canine ammonium urate uroliths and to prevent their recurrence, because it contains fewer purine precursors than do many other sources of protein. However, an important question is whether reduced quantities of dietary casein have any benefit in modifying saturation of urine with urates. To answer this question, activity productd ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were determined in 24-hour urine samples produced by 6 healthy Beagles during periods of consumption of a 10.4% protein, casein-based (10.4% casein) diet and a 20.8% protein, casein-based (20.8% casein) diet. Significantly lower activity product. ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Significantly lower 24-hour urinary excretions of ammonia and phosphorus were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretions of magnesium and 24-hour urine pH values were significantly higher when dogs were fed the 10.4% casein diet. These results suggest that use of the 10.4% casein diet in protocols designed for dissolution and prevention of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate uroliths in dogs may be beneficial.

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