Effects of age on temperature-related variation in motor nerve conduction velocity in healthy chickens

Rodney S. Bagley From, the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (Bagley, Gay), and Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Wheeler).

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Simon J. Wheeler From, the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (Bagley, Gay), and Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Wheeler).

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John M. Gay From, the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (Bagley, Gay), and Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Wheeler).

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Abstract

Muscle potentials evoked by stimulation of the sciatic nerve were evaluated in 4- and 15-week-old chickens. Each bird was anesthetized and slowly cooled externally from a normal body temperature of 40 C to 28 C, and motor nerve conduction velocities were measured at various intervals during cooling. Motor nerve conduction velocity decreased linearly with decreasing limb temperature in both groups. The rate of change in motor nerve conduction velocity per degree in 2 groups (2.13 m/s/C vs 1.84 m/s/ C) fell just short of a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0508), indicating that an age-related effect on temperature-associated variation in motor nerve conduction velocity may be present.

Abstract

Muscle potentials evoked by stimulation of the sciatic nerve were evaluated in 4- and 15-week-old chickens. Each bird was anesthetized and slowly cooled externally from a normal body temperature of 40 C to 28 C, and motor nerve conduction velocities were measured at various intervals during cooling. Motor nerve conduction velocity decreased linearly with decreasing limb temperature in both groups. The rate of change in motor nerve conduction velocity per degree in 2 groups (2.13 m/s/C vs 1.84 m/s/ C) fell just short of a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0508), indicating that an age-related effect on temperature-associated variation in motor nerve conduction velocity may be present.

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