Efficacy of lufenuron against developmental stages of fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) in dogs housed in simulated home environments

Byron L. Blagbum From the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5519 (Blagbum Hendrix, Vaughan, Lindsay), and CIBA Animal Health, Greensboro, NC 27419 (Barnett).

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Charles M. Hendrix From the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5519 (Blagbum Hendrix, Vaughan, Lindsay), and CIBA Animal Health, Greensboro, NC 27419 (Barnett).

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Joy L. Vaughan From the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5519 (Blagbum Hendrix, Vaughan, Lindsay), and CIBA Animal Health, Greensboro, NC 27419 (Barnett).

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David S. Lindsay From the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5519 (Blagbum Hendrix, Vaughan, Lindsay), and CIBA Animal Health, Greensboro, NC 27419 (Barnett).

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Sharron H. Barnett From the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5519 (Blagbum Hendrix, Vaughan, Lindsay), and CIBA Animal Health, Greensboro, NC 27419 (Barnett).

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Abstract

Twenty-four, adult, female Beagles were arranged by body weight from greatest to least and allocated to 2 groups of 12 dogs, using random numbers. Dogs were housed collectively in 2 adjacent metal buildings, each divided into 4 rooms measuring 2.1 × 3.7 m. Each room was paneled and carpeted and had an access door to the outside with a connecting run that measured 2.1 × 9.1 m. Each run had a surface consisting of 5 cm of pea gravel overlaying 5 cm of sand, and was partially covered by an awning that provided shade at its proximal end. For placement in room/run units, dogs in each of the treated and control groups were allotted to 4 subgroups of 3 dogs each. Each subgroup of dogs was placed in a separate room/run unit. Units containing treatment or control subgroups were alternated to avoid placing identically treated subgroups adjacent to each other. Dogs of subgroups A, C, E, and G were treated with lufenuron monthly at a minimal target dosage of 10 mg/kg of body weight; those of subgroups B, D, F, and H were treated with excipient tablets. Dogs were treated on study days 7, 37, 68, and 98. Each dog was infested with 100 newly emerged, unfed, insectary-reared, adult Ctenocephalides felts on each of study days 0 and 2. Thereafter, infestations on all dogs were dependent on continued development of fleas either in the indoor or outdoor environment. Numbers of fleas on each of the treated and control dogs were determined, using a nondestructive counting technique on days 6, 14, 21, 28, 35, 56, 70, 84, 98, 112, and 119. On study day 21 and on each collection day thereafter, numbers of adult fleas recovered from treated dogs were significantly (P < 0.05) fewer than those recovered from control dogs. Proportion reduction of fleas on treated vs control dogs exceeded 90% by study day 35 and 95% by study day 56. Efficacies exceeded 95% on all remaining study days except days 98 (94.4%) and 119 (90%). Results of this study indicate that control of flea populations can be achieved in treated dogs approximately 4 to 5 weeks after initial treatment with lufenuron, and that continued monthly treatments will maintain effective control of flea infestations. Adverse reactions or side effects to treatment with lufenuron were not observed in dogs after treatment at any time throughout the study.

Abstract

Twenty-four, adult, female Beagles were arranged by body weight from greatest to least and allocated to 2 groups of 12 dogs, using random numbers. Dogs were housed collectively in 2 adjacent metal buildings, each divided into 4 rooms measuring 2.1 × 3.7 m. Each room was paneled and carpeted and had an access door to the outside with a connecting run that measured 2.1 × 9.1 m. Each run had a surface consisting of 5 cm of pea gravel overlaying 5 cm of sand, and was partially covered by an awning that provided shade at its proximal end. For placement in room/run units, dogs in each of the treated and control groups were allotted to 4 subgroups of 3 dogs each. Each subgroup of dogs was placed in a separate room/run unit. Units containing treatment or control subgroups were alternated to avoid placing identically treated subgroups adjacent to each other. Dogs of subgroups A, C, E, and G were treated with lufenuron monthly at a minimal target dosage of 10 mg/kg of body weight; those of subgroups B, D, F, and H were treated with excipient tablets. Dogs were treated on study days 7, 37, 68, and 98. Each dog was infested with 100 newly emerged, unfed, insectary-reared, adult Ctenocephalides felts on each of study days 0 and 2. Thereafter, infestations on all dogs were dependent on continued development of fleas either in the indoor or outdoor environment. Numbers of fleas on each of the treated and control dogs were determined, using a nondestructive counting technique on days 6, 14, 21, 28, 35, 56, 70, 84, 98, 112, and 119. On study day 21 and on each collection day thereafter, numbers of adult fleas recovered from treated dogs were significantly (P < 0.05) fewer than those recovered from control dogs. Proportion reduction of fleas on treated vs control dogs exceeded 90% by study day 35 and 95% by study day 56. Efficacies exceeded 95% on all remaining study days except days 98 (94.4%) and 119 (90%). Results of this study indicate that control of flea populations can be achieved in treated dogs approximately 4 to 5 weeks after initial treatment with lufenuron, and that continued monthly treatments will maintain effective control of flea infestations. Adverse reactions or side effects to treatment with lufenuron were not observed in dogs after treatment at any time throughout the study.

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