Effect of selenium supplementation on colostral IgG concentration in cows grazing selenium-deficient pastures and on postsuckle serum IgG concentration in their calves

William S. Swecker Jr. From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Swecker, Thatcher), Biomedical Sciences (Blodgett), and Pathobiology (Schurig), Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Animal Sciences (Eversole), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

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Craig D. Thatcher From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Swecker, Thatcher), Biomedical Sciences (Blodgett), and Pathobiology (Schurig), Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Animal Sciences (Eversole), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

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Dan E. Eversole From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Swecker, Thatcher), Biomedical Sciences (Blodgett), and Pathobiology (Schurig), Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Animal Sciences (Eversole), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

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Dennis J. Blodgett From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Swecker, Thatcher), Biomedical Sciences (Blodgett), and Pathobiology (Schurig), Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Animal Sciences (Eversole), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

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Gerhardt G. Schurig From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Swecker, Thatcher), Biomedical Sciences (Blodgett), and Pathobiology (Schurig), Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Animal Sciences (Eversole), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442.

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SUMMARY

Effects of selenium (Se) deficiency and supplementation on production of colostral immunoglobulins by beef cows and transfer of antigen-specific and nonspecific immunoglobulins to their calves were examined. Eighty beef cows, with marginal to deficient Se status (blood Se concentration, 50 μg/L), were allotted by breed and age to 1 of 4 Se treatment groups (n = 20/group): no supplemental Se; parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg of body weight; ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of salt-mineral mix (smm); and parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg plus ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of smm. All cows were inoculated IM with lysozyme. Cows consumed Se-deficient pastures or hay (21 to 62 μg/kg) during the study that began at mid-gestation and ended at postpartum hour 24. Although the concentration of specific lysozyme antibodies was not affected, cows given 120 mg of Se/kg of smm (treatments 3 and 4) had higher colostral IgG concentration (P < 0.002) than did Se-deficient cows (treatments 1 and 2). Calves from cows in treatments 3 and 4 had higher postsuckle serum concentrations of IgG (P < 0.01) than did calves from cows in treatments 1 and 2. Colostral IgM and calf serum IgM concentrations did not differ among treatments.

SUMMARY

Effects of selenium (Se) deficiency and supplementation on production of colostral immunoglobulins by beef cows and transfer of antigen-specific and nonspecific immunoglobulins to their calves were examined. Eighty beef cows, with marginal to deficient Se status (blood Se concentration, 50 μg/L), were allotted by breed and age to 1 of 4 Se treatment groups (n = 20/group): no supplemental Se; parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg of body weight; ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of salt-mineral mix (smm); and parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg plus ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of smm. All cows were inoculated IM with lysozyme. Cows consumed Se-deficient pastures or hay (21 to 62 μg/kg) during the study that began at mid-gestation and ended at postpartum hour 24. Although the concentration of specific lysozyme antibodies was not affected, cows given 120 mg of Se/kg of smm (treatments 3 and 4) had higher colostral IgG concentration (P < 0.002) than did Se-deficient cows (treatments 1 and 2). Calves from cows in treatments 3 and 4 had higher postsuckle serum concentrations of IgG (P < 0.01) than did calves from cows in treatments 1 and 2. Colostral IgM and calf serum IgM concentrations did not differ among treatments.

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