Enrofloxacin concentrations in dogs with normal prostate and dogs with chronic bacterial prostatitis

Mark Dorfman From the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Vetennary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Jeanne Barsanti From the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Vetennary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Steven C. Budsberg From the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Vetennary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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SUMMARY

Chronic Escherichia coli-associated prostatitis was induced in 16 dogs; 9 noninfected dogs served as controls; and all dogs were vasectomized. Two to 3 weeks after instillation of bacteria directly into the prostate, the urine or prostatic fluid or both from 13 of 16 dogs were culture positive. Enrofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, was administered orally to all dogs during the third or fourth week after surgery, at a dosage of approximately 5 mg/kg of body weight, every 12 hours for 7 days. Serum and prostatic fluid concentrations of enrofloxacin were concurrently measured in all dogs on days 2, 4, and 6 at 2 hours after dosing. Serum and prostatic tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin were concurrently measured in all dogs on day 7, at 1.5, 3, 4.5, and 6 hours after dosing. When values for these samples were compared, using a two-factor anova, significant differences were not found. Use of this dosing regimen of enrofloxacin resulted in prostatic fluid and prostatic tissue concentrations exceeding the minimum inhibitory concentration of most pathogens that cause bacterial prostatitis. In addition, prostatic fluid-to-serum and prostatic tissue-to-serum concentration ratios were greater than 1.0.

SUMMARY

Chronic Escherichia coli-associated prostatitis was induced in 16 dogs; 9 noninfected dogs served as controls; and all dogs were vasectomized. Two to 3 weeks after instillation of bacteria directly into the prostate, the urine or prostatic fluid or both from 13 of 16 dogs were culture positive. Enrofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, was administered orally to all dogs during the third or fourth week after surgery, at a dosage of approximately 5 mg/kg of body weight, every 12 hours for 7 days. Serum and prostatic fluid concentrations of enrofloxacin were concurrently measured in all dogs on days 2, 4, and 6 at 2 hours after dosing. Serum and prostatic tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin were concurrently measured in all dogs on day 7, at 1.5, 3, 4.5, and 6 hours after dosing. When values for these samples were compared, using a two-factor anova, significant differences were not found. Use of this dosing regimen of enrofloxacin resulted in prostatic fluid and prostatic tissue concentrations exceeding the minimum inhibitory concentration of most pathogens that cause bacterial prostatitis. In addition, prostatic fluid-to-serum and prostatic tissue-to-serum concentration ratios were greater than 1.0.

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