Effects of storage on serum ionized calcium and pH values in clinically normal dogs

Patricia A. Schenck From the Departments of Vetennary Biosciences (Schenck, Brooks) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Chew), College of Vetennary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Dennis J. Chew From the Departments of Vetennary Biosciences (Schenck, Brooks) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Chew), College of Vetennary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Charles L. Brooks From the Departments of Vetennary Biosciences (Schenck, Brooks) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Chew), College of Vetennary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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SUMMARY

The stability of ionized calcium (CaI) concentration and pH in sera (n = 14) stored at 23 or 4 C for 6, 9, 12, 24, 48, or 72 hours, or −10 C for 1, 3, 7, 14, or 30 days was evaluated. Also studied were the effects of oxygen exposure, cold handling, and feeding on CaI and pH values. Results indicated that serum CaI concentration was stable throughout 72 hours of storage at 23 or 4 C, and for 7 days at −10 C. Serum CaI concentration significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by 14 days of storage at −10 C. Serum pH was stable for 6 hours at 23 or 4 C, and for 24 hours at −10 C, but significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 9 hours of storage at 23 or 4 C and by 3 days at −10 C. Exposure of the surface of the serum to air immediately before measurement had no effect on CaI or pH values, but mixing serum with air resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) decreased CaI concentration and increased pH. Handling of blood on ice resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) higher serum pH, compared with blood handled at 23 C, but serum CaI concentration was unaffected. Serum obtained at 2 hours after feeding did not have any significant changes in CaI total calcium, or pH values. It appears that if canine serum is obtained, handled, and stored anaerobically, CaI concentration can be accurately measured after 72 hours at 23 or 4 C, or after 7 days at −10 C.

SUMMARY

The stability of ionized calcium (CaI) concentration and pH in sera (n = 14) stored at 23 or 4 C for 6, 9, 12, 24, 48, or 72 hours, or −10 C for 1, 3, 7, 14, or 30 days was evaluated. Also studied were the effects of oxygen exposure, cold handling, and feeding on CaI and pH values. Results indicated that serum CaI concentration was stable throughout 72 hours of storage at 23 or 4 C, and for 7 days at −10 C. Serum CaI concentration significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by 14 days of storage at −10 C. Serum pH was stable for 6 hours at 23 or 4 C, and for 24 hours at −10 C, but significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 9 hours of storage at 23 or 4 C and by 3 days at −10 C. Exposure of the surface of the serum to air immediately before measurement had no effect on CaI or pH values, but mixing serum with air resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) decreased CaI concentration and increased pH. Handling of blood on ice resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) higher serum pH, compared with blood handled at 23 C, but serum CaI concentration was unaffected. Serum obtained at 2 hours after feeding did not have any significant changes in CaI total calcium, or pH values. It appears that if canine serum is obtained, handled, and stored anaerobically, CaI concentration can be accurately measured after 72 hours at 23 or 4 C, or after 7 days at −10 C.

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