Effect of hypertonic saline solution on left ventricular afterload in normovolumic dogs

Peter D. Constable From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (Constable, Muir), and Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine (Binkley), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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William W. Muir III From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (Constable, Muir), and Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine (Binkley), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Phillip F. Binkley From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (Constable, Muir), and Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine (Binkley), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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SUMMARY

The effects of hypertonic saline solution (hss) and hyperosmotic dextrose (hd; 2,400 mosm/L, 4 mV kg of body weight) on left ventricular afterload were determined in normovolumic, chloralose-anesthetized, autonomically blocked dogs (n = 8). Solutions were infused iv over 3 minutes. Left ventricular afterload was assessed by use of a dual-tipped micromanometer catheter with an electromagnetic fluidvelocity sensor located in the ascending aorta, and the impedance spectrum was calculated after Fourier analysis of signal-averaged aortic pressure and flow signals. Hypertonic saline solution and hd decreased peripheral resistance, reflection coefficient at zero frequency, and frequency of the first zero crossing of the phase angle for 3 to 5 minutes after either fluid was administered. Characteristic impedance was not altered by hss or hd. These impedance spectrum changes indicate transient vasodilatation and afterload reduction. We conclude that the vascular effect of an ionic hyperosmotic solution (hss) is similar to that of a nonionic hyperosmotic solution (hd), and that hss and hd transiently decrease afterload in normovolumic dogs. The duration of the afterload reduction after hss administration appeared to be too short to be of great clinical benefit.

SUMMARY

The effects of hypertonic saline solution (hss) and hyperosmotic dextrose (hd; 2,400 mosm/L, 4 mV kg of body weight) on left ventricular afterload were determined in normovolumic, chloralose-anesthetized, autonomically blocked dogs (n = 8). Solutions were infused iv over 3 minutes. Left ventricular afterload was assessed by use of a dual-tipped micromanometer catheter with an electromagnetic fluidvelocity sensor located in the ascending aorta, and the impedance spectrum was calculated after Fourier analysis of signal-averaged aortic pressure and flow signals. Hypertonic saline solution and hd decreased peripheral resistance, reflection coefficient at zero frequency, and frequency of the first zero crossing of the phase angle for 3 to 5 minutes after either fluid was administered. Characteristic impedance was not altered by hss or hd. These impedance spectrum changes indicate transient vasodilatation and afterload reduction. We conclude that the vascular effect of an ionic hyperosmotic solution (hss) is similar to that of a nonionic hyperosmotic solution (hd), and that hss and hd transiently decrease afterload in normovolumic dogs. The duration of the afterload reduction after hss administration appeared to be too short to be of great clinical benefit.

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