Pathologic effects in brain after intracranial pressure monitoring in clinically normal dogs, using a fiberoptic monitoring system

Rodney S. Bagley From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Robert D. Keegan From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Stephen A. Greene From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Michael L. Harrington From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Michael P. Moore From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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SUMMARY

During 2 separate studies, intracranial pressure (icp) was measured in 13 healthy dogs (group A, n = 7; group B, n = 6), using a fiberoptic monitoring system implanted surgically in the right superficial cerebral cortex. Average icp was measured for 15 minutes after a 15-minute post-implantation period of equilibration. Intracranial pressure was measured in group-A dogs at 2.0 and 1.3% end-tidal isoflurane concentrations. Mean ± 1 sd icp in group-A dogs at 2.0 and 1.3% end-tidal isoflurane concentrations was 11 ± 2 and 11 ± 3 mm of Hg, respectively. Dogs of group A were euthanatized immediately after measurements were obtained. Mean icp ± 1 sd in group-B dogs was 11 ± 3 mm of Hg. After monitoring, but prior to euthanasia, group-B dogs underwent callosotomy, and were maintained for 30 days after surgery. The brain was removed from all dogs, formalin fixed, and examined grossly and microscopically for lesions associated with fiberoptic cable implantation. Variable degrees of hemorrhage and mechanical brain damage were seen focally around the catheter site in all brains from group-A dogs, especially when the cable entered through a sulcus. In 1 dog, local vacuolation was seen in the brain immediately adjacent to the tract associated with implantation of the fiberoptic catheter. In all other dogs, the additional cortex was histologically normal. Histologic lesions associated with cable implantation were not observed in group-B dogs.

SUMMARY

During 2 separate studies, intracranial pressure (icp) was measured in 13 healthy dogs (group A, n = 7; group B, n = 6), using a fiberoptic monitoring system implanted surgically in the right superficial cerebral cortex. Average icp was measured for 15 minutes after a 15-minute post-implantation period of equilibration. Intracranial pressure was measured in group-A dogs at 2.0 and 1.3% end-tidal isoflurane concentrations. Mean ± 1 sd icp in group-A dogs at 2.0 and 1.3% end-tidal isoflurane concentrations was 11 ± 2 and 11 ± 3 mm of Hg, respectively. Dogs of group A were euthanatized immediately after measurements were obtained. Mean icp ± 1 sd in group-B dogs was 11 ± 3 mm of Hg. After monitoring, but prior to euthanasia, group-B dogs underwent callosotomy, and were maintained for 30 days after surgery. The brain was removed from all dogs, formalin fixed, and examined grossly and microscopically for lesions associated with fiberoptic cable implantation. Variable degrees of hemorrhage and mechanical brain damage were seen focally around the catheter site in all brains from group-A dogs, especially when the cable entered through a sulcus. In 1 dog, local vacuolation was seen in the brain immediately adjacent to the tract associated with implantation of the fiberoptic catheter. In all other dogs, the additional cortex was histologically normal. Histologic lesions associated with cable implantation were not observed in group-B dogs.

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