Intraocular pressure measurement through two types of plano therapeutic soft contact lenses in dogs

Paul E. Miller From the Comparative Ophthalmology Research Laboratories, Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

Search for other papers by Paul E. Miller in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
and
Christopher J. Murphy From the Comparative Ophthalmology Research Laboratories, Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

Search for other papers by Christopher J. Murphy in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

Intraocular pressure (iop) was measured by use of Mackay-Marg applanation tonometry in 8 normal, manometrically controlled, enucleated, canine eyes with and without 1 of 2 plano therapeutic soft contact lenses (1 and 2) covering the cornea. Differences were not significant between measurements made without a contact lens and those made through either lens at manometer iop < 30 mm of Hg. At manometer iop ≥ 30 mm of Hg, use of a contact lens tended to result in a statistically greater (P < 0.05) estimate of iop than when a lens was not used. This difference, however, achieved only a maximum of 2.6 mm of Hg at the 80 mm of Hg value, and was not regarded as clinically important. Measurements obtained through lens 1 were not significantly different from those obtained through lens 2. The iop can be accurately estimated in dogs, using the Mackay-Marg tonometer, without removing either type of bandage soft contact lens, thereby avoiding potential disruption of an already compromised cornea.

SUMMARY

Intraocular pressure (iop) was measured by use of Mackay-Marg applanation tonometry in 8 normal, manometrically controlled, enucleated, canine eyes with and without 1 of 2 plano therapeutic soft contact lenses (1 and 2) covering the cornea. Differences were not significant between measurements made without a contact lens and those made through either lens at manometer iop < 30 mm of Hg. At manometer iop ≥ 30 mm of Hg, use of a contact lens tended to result in a statistically greater (P < 0.05) estimate of iop than when a lens was not used. This difference, however, achieved only a maximum of 2.6 mm of Hg at the 80 mm of Hg value, and was not regarded as clinically important. Measurements obtained through lens 1 were not significantly different from those obtained through lens 2. The iop can be accurately estimated in dogs, using the Mackay-Marg tonometer, without removing either type of bandage soft contact lens, thereby avoiding potential disruption of an already compromised cornea.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 26 26 3
PDF Downloads 18 18 1
Advertisement