Pulmonary vascular pressures of strenuously exercising Thoroughbreds after administration of flunixin meglumine and furosemide

Murli Manohar From the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 212 Large Animal Clinic, 1102 W. Hazelwood Dr, Urbana, IL 61801.

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 BVSc, PhD

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Summary

High-intensity exercise results in a dramatic increase in mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure of horses, and administration of furosemide 4 hours before exertion significantly attenuates this exercise-induced increment. To test whether this effect of furosemide is mediated via release of prostaglandins, right atrial and pulmonary vascular pressures were measured in 8 healthy, sound, exercise-trained Thoroughbreds at rest and during incremental-step exercise on a treadmill. Horses were studied on 3 separate occasions: after IV administration of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, after administration of furosemide (250 mg, IV, 4 hours before exercise) alone, and after administration of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 8 h for 3 days) and furosemide (250 mg, IV, 4 hours before exercise; last dose of flunixin meglumine was administered 90 seconds after furosemide injection). Experiments on each horse were separated by at least 7 days and were performed in random order. At rest and at the highest workload (14.5 m/s on a 5% uphill incline), mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure recorded after administration of furosemide alone was not significantly different from that recorded after administration of flunixin meglumine and furosemide. However, these values were significantly (P< 0.05) less than corresponding values of mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure recorded after administration of saline solution. Thus, it was concluded that furosemide-induced attenuation of the increment in pulmonary capillary blood pressure during strenuous exercise is probably not mediated via prostaglandin production.

Summary

High-intensity exercise results in a dramatic increase in mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure of horses, and administration of furosemide 4 hours before exertion significantly attenuates this exercise-induced increment. To test whether this effect of furosemide is mediated via release of prostaglandins, right atrial and pulmonary vascular pressures were measured in 8 healthy, sound, exercise-trained Thoroughbreds at rest and during incremental-step exercise on a treadmill. Horses were studied on 3 separate occasions: after IV administration of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, after administration of furosemide (250 mg, IV, 4 hours before exercise) alone, and after administration of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 8 h for 3 days) and furosemide (250 mg, IV, 4 hours before exercise; last dose of flunixin meglumine was administered 90 seconds after furosemide injection). Experiments on each horse were separated by at least 7 days and were performed in random order. At rest and at the highest workload (14.5 m/s on a 5% uphill incline), mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure recorded after administration of furosemide alone was not significantly different from that recorded after administration of flunixin meglumine and furosemide. However, these values were significantly (P< 0.05) less than corresponding values of mean pulmonary capillary blood pressure recorded after administration of saline solution. Thus, it was concluded that furosemide-induced attenuation of the increment in pulmonary capillary blood pressure during strenuous exercise is probably not mediated via prostaglandin production.

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