Sensory nerve conduction velocity of the caudal cutaneous sural and medial cutaneous antebrachial nerves of adult horses

L. R. Whalen From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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D. W. Wheeler From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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R. A. LeCouteur From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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J. V. Yovich From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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L. C. Boggie From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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J. L. Grandy From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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R. A. Kainer From the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Whalen, Wheeler, Kainer), Castle Hill Veterinary Hospital, 1 Francis Street, Castle Hill, New South Wales 2154, Australia (LeCouteur, Grandy), Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital, Murdoch University, South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia (Yovich), and Village Veterinary Hospital, 3125 West Benjamin Holt, Stockton, CA 95219 (Boggie).

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Summary

Maximal conduction velocities of compound action potentials evoked by stimuli of 2 times threshold in the caudal cutaneous sural (ccsn) and medial cutaneous antebrachial (mcan) nerves were determined by averaging potentials evoked and recorded through percutaneous needle electrodes. Mean maximal conduction velocities of compound action potentials were: ccsn = 61.3 ± 2.0 meters/second (m/s) and mcan = 56.4 ± 2.8 m/s. To confirm accuracy of our percutaneous recordings, compound action potentials were recorded through bipolar chlorided silver electrodes from the exposed surfaces of fascicles of the ccsn and the mcan. The maximal conduction velocities of these potentials were in agreement with the conduction velocities of compound action potentials that were evoked and recorded through percutaneous needle electrodes. The specificity of stimulating and recording sites was verified by recording before and after section of the nerves. Stimuli from 3 to 5 times threshold evoked a second, longer latency, compound action potential that consisted of a variable number of components in the ccsn and mcan. The configurations and conduction velocities of the shorter latency potentials were the same as those of the single compound action potentials evoked by stimuli of 2 times threshold. Mean conduction velocities of the longer latency potentials were: ccsn = 24.4 ± 2.6 m/s and mcan = 24.5 ± 2.2 m/s. Needle electrode and direct stimulation of either the ccsn or the mcan at 3 to 5 times threshold failed to evoke contractions of limb muscles. Therefore, action potentials that contributed to the evoked compound potentials recorded in these horses arose, most likely, from afferent nerve fibers.

Summary

Maximal conduction velocities of compound action potentials evoked by stimuli of 2 times threshold in the caudal cutaneous sural (ccsn) and medial cutaneous antebrachial (mcan) nerves were determined by averaging potentials evoked and recorded through percutaneous needle electrodes. Mean maximal conduction velocities of compound action potentials were: ccsn = 61.3 ± 2.0 meters/second (m/s) and mcan = 56.4 ± 2.8 m/s. To confirm accuracy of our percutaneous recordings, compound action potentials were recorded through bipolar chlorided silver electrodes from the exposed surfaces of fascicles of the ccsn and the mcan. The maximal conduction velocities of these potentials were in agreement with the conduction velocities of compound action potentials that were evoked and recorded through percutaneous needle electrodes. The specificity of stimulating and recording sites was verified by recording before and after section of the nerves. Stimuli from 3 to 5 times threshold evoked a second, longer latency, compound action potential that consisted of a variable number of components in the ccsn and mcan. The configurations and conduction velocities of the shorter latency potentials were the same as those of the single compound action potentials evoked by stimuli of 2 times threshold. Mean conduction velocities of the longer latency potentials were: ccsn = 24.4 ± 2.6 m/s and mcan = 24.5 ± 2.2 m/s. Needle electrode and direct stimulation of either the ccsn or the mcan at 3 to 5 times threshold failed to evoke contractions of limb muscles. Therefore, action potentials that contributed to the evoked compound potentials recorded in these horses arose, most likely, from afferent nerve fibers.

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