Caudal analgesia induced by epidural or subarachnoid administration of detomidine hydrochloride solution in mares

Roman T. Skarda From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 Dr med vet, PhD
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William W. Muir III From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, PhD

Summary

Seven adult mares were used to determine the analgesic, cns, and cardiopulmonary effects of detomidine hydrochloride solution after epidural or subarachnoid administration, using both regimens in random sequence. At least 1 week elapsed between experiments.

A 17-gauge Huber point (Tuohy) directional needle was used to place a catheter with stylet into either the epidural space at the first coccygeal interspace or the subarachnoid space at the lumbosacral intervertebral junction. Catheters were advanced so that the tips lay at the caudal sacral (S5 to S4) epidural space or at the midsacral (S3 to S2) subarachnoid space. Position of the catheter was confirmed radiographically. A 1% solution of detomidine HCl was injected into the epidural catheter at a dosage of 60 µg/kg of body weight, and was expanded to a 10-ml volume with sterile water to induce selective caudal epidural analgesia (cea). A dose of 30 µg of detomidine HCl/kg expanded to a 3-ml volume with spinal fluid was injected into the subarachnoid catheter to induce caudal subarachnoid analgesia (csa). Analgesia was determined by lack of sensory perception to electrical stimulation (avoidance threshold > 40 V, 0.5-ms duration) at the perineal dermatomes and no response to superficial and deep muscular pinprick stimulation at the pelvic limb and lumbar and thoracic dermatomes. Maximal cea and csa extended from the coccyx to spinal cord segments T15 and T14 at 10 to 25 minutes after epidural and subarachnoid drug administrations in 2 mares. Analgesia at the perineal area lasted longer after epidural than after subarachnoid administration (142.8 ± 28.8 minutes vs 127.1 ± 27.7 minutes). All mares remained standing. Both cea and csa induced marked sedation, moderate ataxia, minimal cardiopulmonary depression, increased frequency of second-degree atrioventricular heart block, and renal diuresis. All treatments resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, systemic arterial blood pressure, pcv, and plasma total solids concentration. To the contrary, arterial carbon dioxide tension, plasma bicarbonate, and standard base excess concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) increased. Arterial oxygen tension, pH, and rectal temperature did not change significantly from baseline values.

Results indicate that use of detomidine for cea and csa in mares probably induces local spinal and cns effects, marked sedation, moderate ataxia, mild cardiopulmonary depression, and renal diuresis.

Summary

Seven adult mares were used to determine the analgesic, cns, and cardiopulmonary effects of detomidine hydrochloride solution after epidural or subarachnoid administration, using both regimens in random sequence. At least 1 week elapsed between experiments.

A 17-gauge Huber point (Tuohy) directional needle was used to place a catheter with stylet into either the epidural space at the first coccygeal interspace or the subarachnoid space at the lumbosacral intervertebral junction. Catheters were advanced so that the tips lay at the caudal sacral (S5 to S4) epidural space or at the midsacral (S3 to S2) subarachnoid space. Position of the catheter was confirmed radiographically. A 1% solution of detomidine HCl was injected into the epidural catheter at a dosage of 60 µg/kg of body weight, and was expanded to a 10-ml volume with sterile water to induce selective caudal epidural analgesia (cea). A dose of 30 µg of detomidine HCl/kg expanded to a 3-ml volume with spinal fluid was injected into the subarachnoid catheter to induce caudal subarachnoid analgesia (csa). Analgesia was determined by lack of sensory perception to electrical stimulation (avoidance threshold > 40 V, 0.5-ms duration) at the perineal dermatomes and no response to superficial and deep muscular pinprick stimulation at the pelvic limb and lumbar and thoracic dermatomes. Maximal cea and csa extended from the coccyx to spinal cord segments T15 and T14 at 10 to 25 minutes after epidural and subarachnoid drug administrations in 2 mares. Analgesia at the perineal area lasted longer after epidural than after subarachnoid administration (142.8 ± 28.8 minutes vs 127.1 ± 27.7 minutes). All mares remained standing. Both cea and csa induced marked sedation, moderate ataxia, minimal cardiopulmonary depression, increased frequency of second-degree atrioventricular heart block, and renal diuresis. All treatments resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, systemic arterial blood pressure, pcv, and plasma total solids concentration. To the contrary, arterial carbon dioxide tension, plasma bicarbonate, and standard base excess concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) increased. Arterial oxygen tension, pH, and rectal temperature did not change significantly from baseline values.

Results indicate that use of detomidine for cea and csa in mares probably induces local spinal and cns effects, marked sedation, moderate ataxia, mild cardiopulmonary depression, and renal diuresis.

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