Tonometry of normal eyes in raptors

Jean Stiles From the Departments of Surgery (Stiles, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745.

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 MS, DVM
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Nedim C. Buyukmihci From the Departments of Surgery (Stiles, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745.

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Thomas B. Farver From the Departments of Surgery (Stiles, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8745.

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 PhD

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Summary

An applanation tonometer was used to estimate intraocular pressure in normal eyes of several species of raptors. No bird had active injury or illness, though some were nonreleasable to the Wild because of previous injury. Mean (± sd) intraocular pressure was 20.6 (± 3.4) mm of Hg in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis, n = 10), 20.8 (± 2.3) mm of Hg in Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni, n = 6), 21.5 (± 3.0) mm of Hg in golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos, n = 7), 20.6 (± 2.0) mm of Hg in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, n = 3), and 10.8 (± 3.6) mm of Hg in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus, n = 6). There was no significant difference in intraocular pressure between hawks and eagles. Mean pressure in great horned owls was significantly (P < 0.01) lower than pressure in hawks or eagles. Reliable intraocular pressure readings could not be obtained in barn owls (Tyto alba).

Summary

An applanation tonometer was used to estimate intraocular pressure in normal eyes of several species of raptors. No bird had active injury or illness, though some were nonreleasable to the Wild because of previous injury. Mean (± sd) intraocular pressure was 20.6 (± 3.4) mm of Hg in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis, n = 10), 20.8 (± 2.3) mm of Hg in Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni, n = 6), 21.5 (± 3.0) mm of Hg in golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos, n = 7), 20.6 (± 2.0) mm of Hg in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, n = 3), and 10.8 (± 3.6) mm of Hg in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus, n = 6). There was no significant difference in intraocular pressure between hawks and eagles. Mean pressure in great horned owls was significantly (P < 0.01) lower than pressure in hawks or eagles. Reliable intraocular pressure readings could not be obtained in barn owls (Tyto alba).

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