Ferula communis variety brevifolia intoxication of sheep

Noursaid Tligui From the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II, BP. 6202, Rabat, Morocco (Tligui), and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Ruth).

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George R. Ruth From the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II, BP. 6202, Rabat, Morocco (Tligui), and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Ruth).

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Summary

Sheep given powdered Ferula communis variety brevifolia at dosage of 2.5 g/kg of body weight/d for 15 days developed classical clinical signs of intoxication: anorexia, somnolence, apparent weakness, and hemorrhage. Marked reduction of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and prolongation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were consistent with presence of ferulenol, a toxic coumarinic factor in the plant. Changes induced in the coagulation system developed by the second day of plant administration and were normal within 4 days after dosing was stopped. There was no evidence of primary liver damage or platelet malfunction. Of 6 intoxicated sheep, 2 died with only minimal evidence of hemorrhage.

Summary

Sheep given powdered Ferula communis variety brevifolia at dosage of 2.5 g/kg of body weight/d for 15 days developed classical clinical signs of intoxication: anorexia, somnolence, apparent weakness, and hemorrhage. Marked reduction of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and prolongation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were consistent with presence of ferulenol, a toxic coumarinic factor in the plant. Changes induced in the coagulation system developed by the second day of plant administration and were normal within 4 days after dosing was stopped. There was no evidence of primary liver damage or platelet malfunction. Of 6 intoxicated sheep, 2 died with only minimal evidence of hemorrhage.

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