Effects of subject velocity on force plate-measured ground reaction forces in healthy Greyhounds at the trot

C. M. Riggs From the College of Veterinary Medicine (Riggs, DeCamp, Braden, Richter) and Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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C. E. DeCamp From the College of Veterinary Medicine (Riggs, DeCamp, Braden, Richter) and Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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 DVM, MS
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R. W. Soutas-Little From the College of Veterinary Medicine (Riggs, DeCamp, Braden, Richter) and Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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T. D. Braden From the College of Veterinary Medicine (Riggs, DeCamp, Braden, Richter) and Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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M. A. Richter From the College of Veterinary Medicine (Riggs, DeCamp, Braden, Richter) and Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Summary

Force plate gait analysis was used to study the effects of subject velocity on ground reaction forces. Seven adult Greyhounds were trotted at 3 distinct velocities: 1.5 to 1.8 m/s, 2.1 to 2.4 m/s, and 2.7 to 3.0 m/s. Forelimb and hind limb peak vertical forces increased with increase in velocity (P < 0.05). Forelimb and hind limb vertical impulses decreased as velocity increased (P < 0.05). Significant variations were not observed for craniocaudal or mediolateral peak forces or impulses. It was concluded that velocity significantly (P < 0.05) influenced ground reaction forces and impulses, and must be controlled in experimental design.

Summary

Force plate gait analysis was used to study the effects of subject velocity on ground reaction forces. Seven adult Greyhounds were trotted at 3 distinct velocities: 1.5 to 1.8 m/s, 2.1 to 2.4 m/s, and 2.7 to 3.0 m/s. Forelimb and hind limb peak vertical forces increased with increase in velocity (P < 0.05). Forelimb and hind limb vertical impulses decreased as velocity increased (P < 0.05). Significant variations were not observed for craniocaudal or mediolateral peak forces or impulses. It was concluded that velocity significantly (P < 0.05) influenced ground reaction forces and impulses, and must be controlled in experimental design.

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