Comparative efficacy of flunixin, ketoprofen, and ketorolac for treating endotoxemic neonatal calves

Susan D. Semrad From the Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.

Search for other papers by Susan D. Semrad in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or 1 of 3 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsaid) was administered iv to 5 neonatal calves 15 minutes after the start of a 3-hour iv infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (lps; 2 µg/kg/h). Four additional calves were given a 3-hour iv infusion of saline solution alone. Clinical attitude, mean arterial blood pressure, pcv, wbc, and plasma lactate, glucose, and eicosanoid concentrations (thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF) were monitored for 12 hours.

Flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg of body weight, iv), ketoprofen (2.2 mg/kg, iv), and ketorolac tromethamine (1.1 mg/kg, iv) each ameliorated the clinical signs of endotoxemia and lps-induced lacticemia, but failed to significantly alter the degree of leukopenia or hypoglycemia associated with infusion of lps. Although the 3 nsaid prevented eicosanoid production, they provided only partial protection against lps-induced hypotension. Each nsaid modified the response to lps, but none was clearly superior to the others in modulating the clinical signs or physiologic alterations induced by infusion of lps in neonatal calves.

Summary

Saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or 1 of 3 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsaid) was administered iv to 5 neonatal calves 15 minutes after the start of a 3-hour iv infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (lps; 2 µg/kg/h). Four additional calves were given a 3-hour iv infusion of saline solution alone. Clinical attitude, mean arterial blood pressure, pcv, wbc, and plasma lactate, glucose, and eicosanoid concentrations (thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF) were monitored for 12 hours.

Flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg of body weight, iv), ketoprofen (2.2 mg/kg, iv), and ketorolac tromethamine (1.1 mg/kg, iv) each ameliorated the clinical signs of endotoxemia and lps-induced lacticemia, but failed to significantly alter the degree of leukopenia or hypoglycemia associated with infusion of lps. Although the 3 nsaid prevented eicosanoid production, they provided only partial protection against lps-induced hypotension. Each nsaid modified the response to lps, but none was clearly superior to the others in modulating the clinical signs or physiologic alterations induced by infusion of lps in neonatal calves.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 77 77 21
PDF Downloads 27 27 3
Advertisement