Abomasal interstitial fluid-to-blood concentration gradient of pepsinogen in calves with type-1 and type-2 ostertagiosis

David G. Baker From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Baker, Gershwin) and Physiological Sciences (Bruss), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Michael L. Bruss From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Baker, Gershwin) and Physiological Sciences (Bruss), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Laurel J. Gershwin From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Baker, Gershwin) and Physiological Sciences (Bruss), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Summary

Pepsinogen and protein concentrations were determined in blood samples, collected from the left gastroepiploic artery and vein, and in abomasal lymph from 15 steers naturally infected with Ostertagia ostertagi and 4 uninfected steers. In steers with type-1 ostertagiosis, the concentration gradient between the mucosal interstitium and the blood alone could account for higher than normal serum pepsinogen concentrations. High interstitial pepsinogen concentrations may have resulted from increased epithelial permeability or increased pepsinogen production and secretion. However, in steers with type-2 ostertagiosis, the concentration gradient could not entirely account for the high serum pepsinogen concentrations, suggesting that capillary permeability or surface area may have been altered. Lymphatic uptake contributed pepsinogen to the blood in all infected steers.

Summary

Pepsinogen and protein concentrations were determined in blood samples, collected from the left gastroepiploic artery and vein, and in abomasal lymph from 15 steers naturally infected with Ostertagia ostertagi and 4 uninfected steers. In steers with type-1 ostertagiosis, the concentration gradient between the mucosal interstitium and the blood alone could account for higher than normal serum pepsinogen concentrations. High interstitial pepsinogen concentrations may have resulted from increased epithelial permeability or increased pepsinogen production and secretion. However, in steers with type-2 ostertagiosis, the concentration gradient could not entirely account for the high serum pepsinogen concentrations, suggesting that capillary permeability or surface area may have been altered. Lymphatic uptake contributed pepsinogen to the blood in all infected steers.

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