Scanning electron microscopy of intraocular lenses that had been implanted in dogs

Brian C. Gilger From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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R. David Whitley From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Susan A. McLaughlin From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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James C. Wright From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Timothy R. Boosinger From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Summary

Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate changes on the surfaces of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma), silicone, and polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) intraocular lenses (iol) that had been implanted in the anterior chambers of the right eyes of 15 dogs. Five dogs received pmma iol; 5 dogs received silicone iol; and 5 dogs received hema iol. Twenty-eight days after surgery, the iol were removed and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Nonimplanted iol of each type were processed identically for comparison. Implanted pmma iol had significantly more debris and macrophages on their surfaces than did silicone iol or hema iol. Silicone iol had significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol. Silicone iol had surface defects attributable to handling by surgical instruments. Implanted hema iol had multiple pits that appeared to be caused by biodegradation.

Summary

Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate changes on the surfaces of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma), silicone, and polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) intraocular lenses (iol) that had been implanted in the anterior chambers of the right eyes of 15 dogs. Five dogs received pmma iol; 5 dogs received silicone iol; and 5 dogs received hema iol. Twenty-eight days after surgery, the iol were removed and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Nonimplanted iol of each type were processed identically for comparison. Implanted pmma iol had significantly more debris and macrophages on their surfaces than did silicone iol or hema iol. Silicone iol had significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol. Silicone iol had surface defects attributable to handling by surgical instruments. Implanted hema iol had multiple pits that appeared to be caused by biodegradation.

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