Lung tissue concentrations and plasma pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin in calves with acute pneumonia

Michael D. Apley From the Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Dan W. Upson From the Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Summary

Plasma and lung tissue pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin in calves with naturally induced acute pneumonia were determined in 2 separate studies. A maximal pneumonic tissue concentration of 1.17 μg/ g was achieved 1.8 hours after im injection of 1.25 mg of danofloxacin/kg of body weight. Pneumonic tissue danofloxacin concentrations were 5.5 times greater than those in plasma at 1 and 2 hours after injection. Cranioventral pneumonic tissue had significantly decreased danofloxacin concentration, compared with that of grossly normal tissue from the caudodorsal part of the lungs at 2 of 6 sample times.

After iv injection, the apparent steady-state volume of distribution was 3.44 ± 1.13 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 6.26 ± 2.27 hours. Maximal plasma danofloxacin concentration of 0.25 μg/ml was detected 0.80 hour after im injection. Bioavailability was 91%.

Our findings indicated that a large percentage of danofloxacin is rapidly absorbed after im administration to calves with acute pneumonia. Extensive tissue penetration was suggested by a high steady-state volume of distribution and was indicated by high concentrations in pneumonic tissue.

Summary

Plasma and lung tissue pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin in calves with naturally induced acute pneumonia were determined in 2 separate studies. A maximal pneumonic tissue concentration of 1.17 μg/ g was achieved 1.8 hours after im injection of 1.25 mg of danofloxacin/kg of body weight. Pneumonic tissue danofloxacin concentrations were 5.5 times greater than those in plasma at 1 and 2 hours after injection. Cranioventral pneumonic tissue had significantly decreased danofloxacin concentration, compared with that of grossly normal tissue from the caudodorsal part of the lungs at 2 of 6 sample times.

After iv injection, the apparent steady-state volume of distribution was 3.44 ± 1.13 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 6.26 ± 2.27 hours. Maximal plasma danofloxacin concentration of 0.25 μg/ml was detected 0.80 hour after im injection. Bioavailability was 91%.

Our findings indicated that a large percentage of danofloxacin is rapidly absorbed after im administration to calves with acute pneumonia. Extensive tissue penetration was suggested by a high steady-state volume of distribution and was indicated by high concentrations in pneumonic tissue.

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