Pharmacokinetics of propofol in mixed-breed dogs and Greyhounds

D. L. Zoran From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Zoran, Riedesel) and Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (Dyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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D. H. Riedesel From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Zoran, Riedesel) and Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (Dyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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D. C. Dyer From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Zoran, Riedesel) and Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (Dyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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Summary

Pharmacokinetics and recovery characteristics of propofol in Greyhounds and mixed-breed dogs were compared. In all dogs, disposition of propofol was adequately described by a 2-compartment open model, with a rapid distribution phase followed by a slower elimination phase. When findings in Greyhounds were compared with those in mixed-breed dogs, significant differences were observed in mean concentrations of propofol in blood, recovery characteristics, and estimates for apparent volume of distribution, volume of distribution at steady state, and total body clearance. In addition, Greyhounds recovered from anesthesia at higher concentrations of propofol than did mixed-breed dogs. A secondary peak in blood propofol concentration was observed in 8 of 10 Greyhounds and in 5 of 8 mixed-breed dogs. This peak corresponded to the time of return of the righting reflex.

Summary

Pharmacokinetics and recovery characteristics of propofol in Greyhounds and mixed-breed dogs were compared. In all dogs, disposition of propofol was adequately described by a 2-compartment open model, with a rapid distribution phase followed by a slower elimination phase. When findings in Greyhounds were compared with those in mixed-breed dogs, significant differences were observed in mean concentrations of propofol in blood, recovery characteristics, and estimates for apparent volume of distribution, volume of distribution at steady state, and total body clearance. In addition, Greyhounds recovered from anesthesia at higher concentrations of propofol than did mixed-breed dogs. A secondary peak in blood propofol concentration was observed in 8 of 10 Greyhounds and in 5 of 8 mixed-breed dogs. This peak corresponded to the time of return of the righting reflex.

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