Kinematic gait analysis of the trot in healthy Greyhounds

Charles E. DeCamp From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Robert W. Soutas-Little From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Joe Hauptman From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Bari Olivier From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Terrance Braden From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Aaron Walton From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (DeCamp, Hauptman, Olivier, Braden, Walton), and the College of Osteopathic Medicine (Soutas-Little), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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Summary

A noninvasive computer-assisted kinematic gait analysis was used to describe flexion and extension movements of 6 joints in Greyhounds at a trot. Distinct patterns of movements were described for each joint studied. The coxofemoral and carpal joints were characterized by a single peak of maximal extension. The femorotibial, tarsal, scapulohumeral, and cubital joints had 2 peaks of maximal extension, with 1 peak preceding stance phase and a second peak within stance phase. A two-factor repeated-measures anova was used to determine the variance in measurement of joint angles in degrees that was attributable to trial repetitions and to differences between dogs. The coxofemoral, femorotibial, tarsal, scapulohumeral, and cubital joints had a mean variance attributable to trial repetition of 6.6 (range, 1.7 to 12.9), and a mean variance attributable to differences between dogs of 5.1 (range, 0.9 to 9.2). The carpus had more variance, with a mean variance attributable to trial repetition of 16.3 (range, 13.3 to 20.5), and that attributable to differences between dogs of 31.8 (range, 20.5 to 46.7). Kinematic gait analysis provided a reliable description of flexion and extension movements in Greyhounds with minimal variance attributable to trial repetitions and to differences between dogs.

Summary

A noninvasive computer-assisted kinematic gait analysis was used to describe flexion and extension movements of 6 joints in Greyhounds at a trot. Distinct patterns of movements were described for each joint studied. The coxofemoral and carpal joints were characterized by a single peak of maximal extension. The femorotibial, tarsal, scapulohumeral, and cubital joints had 2 peaks of maximal extension, with 1 peak preceding stance phase and a second peak within stance phase. A two-factor repeated-measures anova was used to determine the variance in measurement of joint angles in degrees that was attributable to trial repetitions and to differences between dogs. The coxofemoral, femorotibial, tarsal, scapulohumeral, and cubital joints had a mean variance attributable to trial repetition of 6.6 (range, 1.7 to 12.9), and a mean variance attributable to differences between dogs of 5.1 (range, 0.9 to 9.2). The carpus had more variance, with a mean variance attributable to trial repetition of 16.3 (range, 13.3 to 20.5), and that attributable to differences between dogs of 31.8 (range, 20.5 to 46.7). Kinematic gait analysis provided a reliable description of flexion and extension movements in Greyhounds with minimal variance attributable to trial repetitions and to differences between dogs.

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