Clinicopathologic findings after experimental implantation of synthetic intraocular lenses in dogs

Brian C. Gilger From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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R. David Whitley From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Susan A. McLaughlin From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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James C. Wright From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Timothy R. Boosinger From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, Whitley, McLaughlin) and Pathobiology (Wright, Boosinger), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523.

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Summary

Clinical findings indicate that canine eyes tolerate implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma) intraocular lenses (iol) well, although inflammation and ocular damage attributable to the implants is not known. The use of silicone or polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) iol has not been reported in dogs. In this study, 15 conditioned, mixed-breed dogs were allotted to 3 groups: 5 received pmma iol; 5 received silicone iol; and 5 received hema iol. The iol optic was inserted into the anterior chamber of the right eye and anchored to the cornea. An identical surgical procedure was done on the left eye, except that no lens optic was inserted. Clinical examination and measurement of corneal thickness were done immediately prior to and after surgery. Aqueous humor samples were collected at the time of surgery and 28 days after surgery. Only mild and transient inflammation was observed in iol-implanted eyes. On several postoperative days, it was found that pmma iol induced significantly greater corneal thickness, aqueous flare, anterior uveal irritation, and corneal edema than did other iol. Significantly more anterior uveal irritation and increased aqueous humor protein concentration was observed with hema iol than with pmma or silicone iol. Silicone iol induced significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol.

Summary

Clinical findings indicate that canine eyes tolerate implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma) intraocular lenses (iol) well, although inflammation and ocular damage attributable to the implants is not known. The use of silicone or polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) iol has not been reported in dogs. In this study, 15 conditioned, mixed-breed dogs were allotted to 3 groups: 5 received pmma iol; 5 received silicone iol; and 5 received hema iol. The iol optic was inserted into the anterior chamber of the right eye and anchored to the cornea. An identical surgical procedure was done on the left eye, except that no lens optic was inserted. Clinical examination and measurement of corneal thickness were done immediately prior to and after surgery. Aqueous humor samples were collected at the time of surgery and 28 days after surgery. Only mild and transient inflammation was observed in iol-implanted eyes. On several postoperative days, it was found that pmma iol induced significantly greater corneal thickness, aqueous flare, anterior uveal irritation, and corneal edema than did other iol. Significantly more anterior uveal irritation and increased aqueous humor protein concentration was observed with hema iol than with pmma or silicone iol. Silicone iol induced significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol.

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