Evaluation of occlusive dressings for management of full-thickness excisional wounds on the distal portion of the limbs of horses

R. D. Howard From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, MS
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T. S. Stasbak From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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G. M. Baxter From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 VMD, MS

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Summary

Two 2.5-cm2 full-thickness skin wounds were created surgically over the lateral aspect of the cannon bone of each limb of 6 horses (n = 48 wounds). Dressings evaluated were a nonadherent gauze pad (group 1); a synthetic semiocclusive dressing, (group 2); equine amnion (group 3); and a synthetic fully occlusive dressing (group 4). Wounds were assessed subjectively at each dressing change, and total wound area, area of granulation tissue, and area of epithelium in each wound were determined by computerized digital analysis of photographs of the wounds. Complete healing time (wound covered by epithelium) also was determined for each wound. Statistical comparisons were made, using Kruskal-Wallis analysis and a Mann-Whitney U test.

Median time to complete healing was: group 1, 53 days; group 2, 71 days; group 3, 63 days; and group 4, 113 days. Time to complete healing was significantly longer for wounds of group-4 horses than all other groups, and wounds of group-1 horses healed faster than did those of group-2 horses (P < 0.05). Wounds in group-4 horses required significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more excisions of granulation tissue (median, 11.5 times) than did those in group-1 (median, 3 5), group-2 (median, 5.5) or group-3 (median, 2.5) horses. Epithelial tissue was detected later in wounds of group-4 horses (median, 27 days) than in wounds of horses in groups 1, 2 or 3 (median, 17 days); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Significant differences were not found for percentage of healing attributable to wound contraction or epithelialization. Use of synthetic semiocclusive and fully occlusive dressings resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) prolonged healing and production of excess wound exudate, compared with control wounds. In this model, occlusion of wounds was not beneficial for healing of full-thickness skin wounds of the distal portion of the limbs of horses.

Summary

Two 2.5-cm2 full-thickness skin wounds were created surgically over the lateral aspect of the cannon bone of each limb of 6 horses (n = 48 wounds). Dressings evaluated were a nonadherent gauze pad (group 1); a synthetic semiocclusive dressing, (group 2); equine amnion (group 3); and a synthetic fully occlusive dressing (group 4). Wounds were assessed subjectively at each dressing change, and total wound area, area of granulation tissue, and area of epithelium in each wound were determined by computerized digital analysis of photographs of the wounds. Complete healing time (wound covered by epithelium) also was determined for each wound. Statistical comparisons were made, using Kruskal-Wallis analysis and a Mann-Whitney U test.

Median time to complete healing was: group 1, 53 days; group 2, 71 days; group 3, 63 days; and group 4, 113 days. Time to complete healing was significantly longer for wounds of group-4 horses than all other groups, and wounds of group-1 horses healed faster than did those of group-2 horses (P < 0.05). Wounds in group-4 horses required significantly (P ≤ 0.05) more excisions of granulation tissue (median, 11.5 times) than did those in group-1 (median, 3 5), group-2 (median, 5.5) or group-3 (median, 2.5) horses. Epithelial tissue was detected later in wounds of group-4 horses (median, 27 days) than in wounds of horses in groups 1, 2 or 3 (median, 17 days); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Significant differences were not found for percentage of healing attributable to wound contraction or epithelialization. Use of synthetic semiocclusive and fully occlusive dressings resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) prolonged healing and production of excess wound exudate, compared with control wounds. In this model, occlusion of wounds was not beneficial for healing of full-thickness skin wounds of the distal portion of the limbs of horses.

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