Kinetic analysis of D-xylose absorption after its intragastric administration to mares deprived of food

Pamela L. Ferrante From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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 DVM, MS
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David E. Freeman From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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 MVB, PhD
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Charles F. Ramberg From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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David S. Kronfeld From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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 DVM, PhD

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Summary

Multicompartmental analysis was applied to study the kinetics of D-xylose distribution after its intragastric administration to healthy mares deprived of food for 12, 36, 72, and 96 hours. Disposition of D-xylose was described by a 5-compartment model. Maximal plasma D-xylose concentration was similar for 12 and 36 hours of food deprivation and was greater (P = 0.0001) than the values for 72 and 96 hours. Peak concentration of D-xylose appeared progressively later as food deprivation proceeded (P = 0.0001). Fractional rate of transfer (k1,6) was less after 96 hours of food deprivation, compared with 12 hours (P = 0.0001), and percentage of D-xylose absorbed was reduced (P = 0.0441) after food deprivation. Fractional rate of transfer (k6,5), representing gastric emptying, tended to progressively decrease with food deprivation.

Results indicated that formal kinetic analysis can be applied to D-xylose absorption kinetics in horses. Reduction in the extent of D-xylose absorption after food deprivation may be partly caused by decreased rate of D-xylose absorption across the small intestinal mucosa, but other factors, such as gastric emptying and nonabsorptive losses, may also be involved.

Summary

Multicompartmental analysis was applied to study the kinetics of D-xylose distribution after its intragastric administration to healthy mares deprived of food for 12, 36, 72, and 96 hours. Disposition of D-xylose was described by a 5-compartment model. Maximal plasma D-xylose concentration was similar for 12 and 36 hours of food deprivation and was greater (P = 0.0001) than the values for 72 and 96 hours. Peak concentration of D-xylose appeared progressively later as food deprivation proceeded (P = 0.0001). Fractional rate of transfer (k1,6) was less after 96 hours of food deprivation, compared with 12 hours (P = 0.0001), and percentage of D-xylose absorbed was reduced (P = 0.0441) after food deprivation. Fractional rate of transfer (k6,5), representing gastric emptying, tended to progressively decrease with food deprivation.

Results indicated that formal kinetic analysis can be applied to D-xylose absorption kinetics in horses. Reduction in the extent of D-xylose absorption after food deprivation may be partly caused by decreased rate of D-xylose absorption across the small intestinal mucosa, but other factors, such as gastric emptying and nonabsorptive losses, may also be involved.

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