Evaluation of the microcirculation of the equine small intestine after intraluminal distention and subsequent decompression

Robin M. Dabareiner From the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Leesburg, VA 22075 (Dabareiner Sullins, White) and the Departments of Surgery (Snyder) and Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Gardner), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Kenneth E. Sullins From the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Leesburg, VA 22075 (Dabareiner Sullins, White) and the Departments of Surgery (Snyder) and Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Gardner), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Jack R. Snyder From the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Leesburg, VA 22075 (Dabareiner Sullins, White) and the Departments of Surgery (Snyder) and Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Gardner), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Nathaniel A. White II From the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Leesburg, VA 22075 (Dabareiner Sullins, White) and the Departments of Surgery (Snyder) and Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Gardner), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Ian A. Gardner From the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Leesburg, VA 22075 (Dabareiner Sullins, White) and the Departments of Surgery (Snyder) and Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Gardner), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Summary

Effects of intraluminal distention (25 cm of H2O, 120 minutes) and subsequent decompression (60 minutes) on intramural vascular patterns of the small intestine was evaluated in 7 anesthetized horses. Intraluminal distention (25 cm of H2O, 120 mintutes) was created in 2 jejunal segments in each horse. Experimental and control segments were removed either immediately after the experimental period or after 60 minutes of decompression. The vascular system of experimental and control jejunal segments was lavaged with NaCl, then was injected with a blue-colored radiopaque medium for microangiography or with a diluted methyl methacrylate for scanning electron microscopy of microcorrosion vascular casts. After angiographic evaluation, tissue sections were prepared for light microscopic evaluation to assess vascular filling and tissue morphology. The distended segments had short villi, which were separated by expanded crypts, and had mesothelial cell loss, neutrophil infiltration, and edema in the seromuscular layer. The number of perfused vessels was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the seromuscular layer and, to a lesser extent, in the mucosal layer of the distended segments, compared with controls. After decompression, the morphologic lesions progressed in mucosal and serosal layers and the number of observed vessels increased in all intramural layers; however, vascular density did not return to the predistention state. These results identify altered intramural vascular patterns in the equine jejunum during luminal distention and subsequent decompression.

Summary

Effects of intraluminal distention (25 cm of H2O, 120 minutes) and subsequent decompression (60 minutes) on intramural vascular patterns of the small intestine was evaluated in 7 anesthetized horses. Intraluminal distention (25 cm of H2O, 120 mintutes) was created in 2 jejunal segments in each horse. Experimental and control segments were removed either immediately after the experimental period or after 60 minutes of decompression. The vascular system of experimental and control jejunal segments was lavaged with NaCl, then was injected with a blue-colored radiopaque medium for microangiography or with a diluted methyl methacrylate for scanning electron microscopy of microcorrosion vascular casts. After angiographic evaluation, tissue sections were prepared for light microscopic evaluation to assess vascular filling and tissue morphology. The distended segments had short villi, which were separated by expanded crypts, and had mesothelial cell loss, neutrophil infiltration, and edema in the seromuscular layer. The number of perfused vessels was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the seromuscular layer and, to a lesser extent, in the mucosal layer of the distended segments, compared with controls. After decompression, the morphologic lesions progressed in mucosal and serosal layers and the number of observed vessels increased in all intramural layers; however, vascular density did not return to the predistention state. These results identify altered intramural vascular patterns in the equine jejunum during luminal distention and subsequent decompression.

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