Use of random fragments of chromosomal DNA to highlight restriction site heterogeneity for fingerprinting isolates of Salmonella typhimurium from hospitalized animals

Lori M. Hansen From the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Hansen, Hirsh), and the Clinical Microbiology Service (Jang, Hirsh), Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Spencer S. Jang From the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Hansen, Hirsh), and the Clinical Microbiology Service (Jang, Hirsh), Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Dwight C. Hirsh From the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology (Hansen, Hirsh), and the Clinical Microbiology Service (Jang, Hirsh), Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Summary

Random fragments of dna were obtained from a cosmid library of Salmonella agona genomic dna. From this library, 2 fragments were chosen and pooled to probe isolates of S typhimurium obtained during an episode of salmonellosis in a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Chromosomal dna from the Salmonella isolates was digested with restriction endonucleases, and was probed with the random fragments of chromosomal dna. This procedure resulted in a fingerprint pattern for each isolate. We found that the method permitted discrimination between isolates involved in the disease episode and S typhimurium obtained prior to the episode. We conclude that random fragments of chromosomal dna are useful for fingerprinting isolates of S typhimurium. Analysis of plasmid dna obtained from the isolates was not as useful. Some isolates found to be identical by restriction site analysis, had plasmids of different molecular weight. These results indicate that plasmid analysis may not be as useful a fingerprinting tool as previously reported.

Summary

Random fragments of dna were obtained from a cosmid library of Salmonella agona genomic dna. From this library, 2 fragments were chosen and pooled to probe isolates of S typhimurium obtained during an episode of salmonellosis in a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Chromosomal dna from the Salmonella isolates was digested with restriction endonucleases, and was probed with the random fragments of chromosomal dna. This procedure resulted in a fingerprint pattern for each isolate. We found that the method permitted discrimination between isolates involved in the disease episode and S typhimurium obtained prior to the episode. We conclude that random fragments of chromosomal dna are useful for fingerprinting isolates of S typhimurium. Analysis of plasmid dna obtained from the isolates was not as useful. Some isolates found to be identical by restriction site analysis, had plasmids of different molecular weight. These results indicate that plasmid analysis may not be as useful a fingerprinting tool as previously reported.

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