Use of a DNA probe to detect the intracellular organism of proliferative enteritis in swine feces

Gary F. Jones From the Department of Veterinary PathoBiology (Jones, Ward, Gebhart, Murtaugh) and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Collins), University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Gary F. Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Gilbert E. Ward From the Department of Veterinary PathoBiology (Jones, Ward, Gebhart, Murtaugh) and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Collins), University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Gilbert E. Ward in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Connie J. Gebhart From the Department of Veterinary PathoBiology (Jones, Ward, Gebhart, Murtaugh) and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Collins), University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Connie J. Gebhart in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Michael P. Murtaugh From the Department of Veterinary PathoBiology (Jones, Ward, Gebhart, Murtaugh) and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Collins), University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Michael P. Murtaugh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
James E. Collins From the Department of Veterinary PathoBiology (Jones, Ward, Gebhart, Murtaugh) and the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine (Collins), University of Minnesota, College of Veterinary Medicine, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by James E. Collins in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

A method of extracting bacterial dna from swine feces was developed and used in a molecular assay for the presence of ileal symbiont (is) intracellularis, formerly known as the Campylobacter-like organism associated with swine with proliferative enteritis. Hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled, is intracellularis-specific probe detected the presence of is intracellularis at a concentration of 107 organisms/g of feces. This method was sufficient to detect is intracellularis in the feces of swine with experimentally induced and naturally acquired infection. Results of the hybridization were in agreement with those from histologic postmortem examination.

Summary

A method of extracting bacterial dna from swine feces was developed and used in a molecular assay for the presence of ileal symbiont (is) intracellularis, formerly known as the Campylobacter-like organism associated with swine with proliferative enteritis. Hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled, is intracellularis-specific probe detected the presence of is intracellularis at a concentration of 107 organisms/g of feces. This method was sufficient to detect is intracellularis in the feces of swine with experimentally induced and naturally acquired infection. Results of the hybridization were in agreement with those from histologic postmortem examination.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 45 45 15
PDF Downloads 24 24 1
Advertisement