Identification of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 isolates from market-stressed feeder calves by use of enzyme and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles

Charles W. Purdy From USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland TX 79012 (Purdy Foster), and Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Scanlan, Loan).

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Charles M. Scanlan From USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland TX 79012 (Purdy Foster), and Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Scanlan, Loan).

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Raymond W. Loan From USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland TX 79012 (Purdy Foster), and Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Scanlan, Loan).

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Gene S. Foster From USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland TX 79012 (Purdy Foster), and Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Scanlan, Loan).

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SUMMARY

An epidemiologic study of Pasteurella haemolytica serovar 1 (Ph1) in market-stressed feeder calves from 7 farms in eastern Tennessee was conducted. The nasal mucus of each calf was cultured sequentially at the farm of origin (day 0), at an auction market (day 133), and at a feedyard in Texas (days 141, 148, 155, and 169). Of the 103 calves tested, 77 were culture-positive, including 1 on day 0, 1 on day 133, 20 on day 141, 57 on day 148, 50 on day 155, and 14 on day 169. From the 143 Ph1 isolates, 20 enzyme profiles were determined by use of a commercial enzyme system that detects 19 enzymatic reactions; 4 antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were obtained, using the disk-diffusion method, which evaluated susceptibility to 11 antibacterial drugs. All isolates were positive for acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase, but were negative for α-galactosidase, α-mannosidase, β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, cystine aminopeptidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, and trypsin. Other positive enzyme reactions included: leucine aminopeptidase, 140 Ph1 isolates; phosphohydrolase, 90 isolates; α-fucosidase, 63 isolates; esterase (C4), 59 isolates; valine aminopeptidase, 30 isolates; esterase lipase (C8), 24 isolates; β-galactosidase, 2 isolates; and α-glucosidase, chymotrypsin and lipase (C14), 1 isolate each. Thirty-four Ph1 profiles were identified, using combined enzyme and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The data indicate that the strains isolated during the feedyard period may have been determined more by farm of origin (P ≤ 0.001) than by habitation with calves from other farms while in the feedyard. The combined enzyme and antimicrobial susceptibility profile method is a rapid and simple epidemiologic technique for tracking Ph1 strains in market-stressed feeder calves.

SUMMARY

An epidemiologic study of Pasteurella haemolytica serovar 1 (Ph1) in market-stressed feeder calves from 7 farms in eastern Tennessee was conducted. The nasal mucus of each calf was cultured sequentially at the farm of origin (day 0), at an auction market (day 133), and at a feedyard in Texas (days 141, 148, 155, and 169). Of the 103 calves tested, 77 were culture-positive, including 1 on day 0, 1 on day 133, 20 on day 141, 57 on day 148, 50 on day 155, and 14 on day 169. From the 143 Ph1 isolates, 20 enzyme profiles were determined by use of a commercial enzyme system that detects 19 enzymatic reactions; 4 antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were obtained, using the disk-diffusion method, which evaluated susceptibility to 11 antibacterial drugs. All isolates were positive for acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase, but were negative for α-galactosidase, α-mannosidase, β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, cystine aminopeptidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, and trypsin. Other positive enzyme reactions included: leucine aminopeptidase, 140 Ph1 isolates; phosphohydrolase, 90 isolates; α-fucosidase, 63 isolates; esterase (C4), 59 isolates; valine aminopeptidase, 30 isolates; esterase lipase (C8), 24 isolates; β-galactosidase, 2 isolates; and α-glucosidase, chymotrypsin and lipase (C14), 1 isolate each. Thirty-four Ph1 profiles were identified, using combined enzyme and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The data indicate that the strains isolated during the feedyard period may have been determined more by farm of origin (P ≤ 0.001) than by habitation with calves from other farms while in the feedyard. The combined enzyme and antimicrobial susceptibility profile method is a rapid and simple epidemiologic technique for tracking Ph1 strains in market-stressed feeder calves.

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