Elbow arthroscopy in clinically normal dogs

Bernadette Van Ryssen From the Radiology Department of the Small Animal Clinic (Van Rijssen, van Bree), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy (Simoens), State University Ghent, Casinoplein 24, 9000 Gent, Belgium.

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Henri van Bree From the Radiology Department of the Small Animal Clinic (Van Rijssen, van Bree), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy (Simoens), State University Ghent, Casinoplein 24, 9000 Gent, Belgium.

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Paul Simoens From the Radiology Department of the Small Animal Clinic (Van Rijssen, van Bree), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy (Simoens), State University Ghent, Casinoplein 24, 9000 Gent, Belgium.

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SUMMARY

After a detailed anatomic study to determine puncture sites, 10 cadaver elbows from 5 dogs were examined arthroscopically to study the normal intraarticular anatomy, as viewed from the medial side. Subsequent dissection revealed absence of neurovascular injury and only minor iatrogenic damage to the cartilage. The technique was clinically applied and evaluated in 13 dogs (26 joints). The dogs recovered without complications. The technique proved to be safe and reliable for direct examination of nearly the entire joint. More specifically, it allowed systematic inspection of the medial and lateral humeral condyles, the medial and lateral coronoid processes, the caudal and middle parts of the head of the radius, the olecranon (including the anconeal process), and the medial collateral ligament.

SUMMARY

After a detailed anatomic study to determine puncture sites, 10 cadaver elbows from 5 dogs were examined arthroscopically to study the normal intraarticular anatomy, as viewed from the medial side. Subsequent dissection revealed absence of neurovascular injury and only minor iatrogenic damage to the cartilage. The technique was clinically applied and evaluated in 13 dogs (26 joints). The dogs recovered without complications. The technique proved to be safe and reliable for direct examination of nearly the entire joint. More specifically, it allowed systematic inspection of the medial and lateral humeral condyles, the medial and lateral coronoid processes, the caudal and middle parts of the head of the radius, the olecranon (including the anconeal process), and the medial collateral ligament.

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