Kinetic analysis of D-xylose distribution after intravenous administration to mares

Pamela L. Ferrante From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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 DVM, MS
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David E. Freeman From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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Charles F. Ramberg From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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David S. Kronfeld From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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SUMMARY

Multicompartmental analysis was applied to study the kinetics of D-xylose distribution after IV administration to healthy mares deprived of food for 12 and 96 hours. Urinary excretion of D-xylose was measured over a 15-hour period after administration. The plasma D-xylose concentrations in this study were in the range found after oral tolerance testing. The disposition of D-xylose was described by a two-compartment model with linear kinetic characteristics. Total volume of distribution decreased significantly (P < 0.025) from 0.270 L/kg of body weight after the 12-hour period of food deprivation to 0.235 L/kg after the 96-hour period. Fractional rate of transfer between the central and peripheral compartments did not change after 96 hours without food. Approximately a third of the D-xylose administered was recovered in the urine. Difference in urinary elimination between the 12- and 96-hour periods was not significant. Nonrenal elimination rate was determined to be twice the renal elimination rate.

The results indicated that formal kinetic analysis can provide useful information about D-xylose distribution in horses. The decreased D-xylose space found after a 96-hour period of food deprivation would tend to increase the plasma D-xylose concentration, and this may help in the interpretation of the D-xylose absorption test applied to anorectic horses.

SUMMARY

Multicompartmental analysis was applied to study the kinetics of D-xylose distribution after IV administration to healthy mares deprived of food for 12 and 96 hours. Urinary excretion of D-xylose was measured over a 15-hour period after administration. The plasma D-xylose concentrations in this study were in the range found after oral tolerance testing. The disposition of D-xylose was described by a two-compartment model with linear kinetic characteristics. Total volume of distribution decreased significantly (P < 0.025) from 0.270 L/kg of body weight after the 12-hour period of food deprivation to 0.235 L/kg after the 96-hour period. Fractional rate of transfer between the central and peripheral compartments did not change after 96 hours without food. Approximately a third of the D-xylose administered was recovered in the urine. Difference in urinary elimination between the 12- and 96-hour periods was not significant. Nonrenal elimination rate was determined to be twice the renal elimination rate.

The results indicated that formal kinetic analysis can provide useful information about D-xylose distribution in horses. The decreased D-xylose space found after a 96-hour period of food deprivation would tend to increase the plasma D-xylose concentration, and this may help in the interpretation of the D-xylose absorption test applied to anorectic horses.

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