Maintenance energy requirement of llamas

Blair R. Carmean From the departments of Animal Sciences (Carmean, K. Johnson, D. Johnson) and Clinical Sciences (L. Johnson), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Kristen A. Johnson From the departments of Animal Sciences (Carmean, K. Johnson, D. Johnson) and Clinical Sciences (L. Johnson), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Donald E. Johnson From the departments of Animal Sciences (Carmean, K. Johnson, D. Johnson) and Clinical Sciences (L. Johnson), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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LaRue W. Johnson From the departments of Animal Sciences (Carmean, K. Johnson, D. Johnson) and Clinical Sciences (L. Johnson), Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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SUMMARY

Five castrated male llamas (mean body weight, 94 kg) were studied in an energy balance trial to determine maintenance energy requirement of llamas. Llamas were fed a 50% oat hay-50% pelleted concentrate diet (2.43 Mcal of metabolizable energy/kg of diet dry matter) at approximately 1.6% of body weight (bw). An 8-day total collection digestion trial was used to determine fecal and urine energy losses. Heat production and methane emissions were determined via indirect respiration calorimetry-measurements on each llama fed at the same level of intake as during the digestion trial and subsequently on days 3 and 4 of a period of nonfeeding. Fecal, urine, and methane energy losses of the llamas fed near-maintenance intake were 32.5, 3.5, and 7.1% of gross energy intake, respectively. The postabsorptive metabolic rate, commonly called nonfed (fasting) heat production, was 59.3 kcal/bw0.75. Using a linear relation between postabsorptive and maintenance energy requirement and efficiency of energy use below maintenance of 0.702, metabolizable energy requirement at maintenance was determined to be 84.5 kcal/bw0.75.

SUMMARY

Five castrated male llamas (mean body weight, 94 kg) were studied in an energy balance trial to determine maintenance energy requirement of llamas. Llamas were fed a 50% oat hay-50% pelleted concentrate diet (2.43 Mcal of metabolizable energy/kg of diet dry matter) at approximately 1.6% of body weight (bw). An 8-day total collection digestion trial was used to determine fecal and urine energy losses. Heat production and methane emissions were determined via indirect respiration calorimetry-measurements on each llama fed at the same level of intake as during the digestion trial and subsequently on days 3 and 4 of a period of nonfeeding. Fecal, urine, and methane energy losses of the llamas fed near-maintenance intake were 32.5, 3.5, and 7.1% of gross energy intake, respectively. The postabsorptive metabolic rate, commonly called nonfed (fasting) heat production, was 59.3 kcal/bw0.75. Using a linear relation between postabsorptive and maintenance energy requirement and efficiency of energy use below maintenance of 0.702, metabolizable energy requirement at maintenance was determined to be 84.5 kcal/bw0.75.

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